LIFT STATION SERVICES AND REPAIRS SEWAGE PUMPS AND FLOATS AND CONTROL PANELS AND REPAIRS

LIFT STATION SERVICES AND REPAIRS

ASAP Pump and Liftstation
LIFT STATION SERVICES AND REPAIRS
May 26th, 2010

LIFT STATION SERVICES AND REPAIRS
LIFT STATION INSPECTION REPAIRS AND INSTALLATION

Jacksonville Duval County 904-346-1266
St Augustine St Johns County 904-824-7144
Orange Park Clay County 904-264-6444
Jacksonville Beaches Duval County 904-246-3969
Fernandina Nassau County 904-277-3040
Macclenny Baker County 904-259-5091
Palm Coast Flagler County 386-439-5290
Daytona Volusia County 386-253-4911
Serving all of Florida and Georgia at 904-346-1266

EMAIL LARRY@1STPROP.COM (feel free to email your bidding packages here)

MONTHLY SERVICE AVAILABLE

MONTHLY SERVICE CONTRACTS

LIFT STATION INSPECTIONS

LICENSED LIFT STATION COMPANY

INSURED

FREE ESTIMATES

STATE OF FLORIDA CERTIFIED PLUMBING CONTRACTOR

CFCO56659

LIFT STATION PUMPS

LIFT STATION CRANE

CONTROL PANELS

RAILS

we have a team of experienced individuals who come into your plant OR BUSINESS with a fresh pair of eyes. The system is checked from influent to effluent. System optimization, equipment efficiency and operational excellence are key components explored. Key Benefits Equipment efficiency Total Cost of Operation reductions Reliability and safety

An onsite audit is conducted to examine system parameters, process controls, and current monitor and control procedures. A physical walk-through is conducted, process flow diagrams are examined, previous design criteria are examined and current standard operating procedures are evaluated along with data logs.

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Serving the entire Jacksonville area including the following communities:

Argyle Forest
Arlington
Asbury Lake
Avondale
Baldwin
Bayard
Baymeadows
Beauclerc
Bryceville
Callahan
Cecil Field
Cedar Point
Cunningham
Dinsmore
Durkeeville
Five Points
Fruit Cove
Ft Caroline
Golfair
Greater Jacksonville
Herlong
Hidden Hills
Hilliard
Jacksonville
Jacksonville Beach
Jacksonville Heights
Jacksonville International Airport
Julington Creek
Lake Shore
Lakeside
Loretto
Macclenney
Mandarin
Marietta
Maxville
Middleburg
Murray Hill
New Berlin
Nocotee
Northside Jacksonville
Oak Leaf
Ocean Way
Ortega
Palencia
Palm Valley
Pecan Park
Pottsburg Creek
Queens Harbor
Riverside
San Jose
San Marco
Soutel
Southbank
Southpoint
Southside Jacksonville
Springfield
St Johns
St Nicholas
Starke
Switzerland
Talbot Island
Tallyrand
Timuquana
Westside Jacksonville
Whitehouse
World Golf Village
Yulee

Wastewater lift stations are used to help transport liquid wastewater from homes and businesses across the City to the treatment plant for processing and cleaning.

Lift Stations

Sewage lift stations are by definition installed in a difficult operating environment. The commonly used prefabricated steel “can” stations are constantly subjected to a corrosive environment on both the interior and exterior of the station. Because these structures are out of sight they often do not receive the type of care and maintenance needed to protect steel surfaces.

ignificant problem many times with lift stations is odor generation. In addition to concerns for sewer personnel exposed to accumulated gases, sewer gases left to accumulate in air-tight environments can create additional toxic gases and underground potential for explosion, stagnation, and dead space in lines. Aeration is an option to reduce odor. Many ODORS accumulate because of oxygen-deficient environments. The cost to retrofit old sewer systems (lines, stations, can be astronomical for a municipality. Sometimes chemicals such as sodium nitrate are added to increase oxygen content in the water and provide the bacteria an alternate oxygen source when free oxygen from mechanical sources is not available. This prevents H2S formation from facultative or anaerobic bacteria. Pine Scented blocks also have been added to neutralize odors so that neighbors are not complaining.

Grease

Fats, oil and grease – – also called FOG in the wastewater business – – can have negative impacts on wastewater collection and treatment systems. Most wastewater collection system blockages can be traced to FOG. Blockages in the wastewater collection system are serious, causing sewage spills, manhole overflows, or sewage backups in homes and businesses. With the increase in fast food restaurants, many municipalities are having problems with an increase in grease build-up in their lift stations.

Why is grease a problem?

In the sewage collection and treatment business Grease is singled out for special attention because of its poor solubility in water and its tendency to separate from the liquid solution.

Large amounts of oil and grease in the wastewater cause trouble in the collection system pipes. It decreases pipe capacity and, therefore, requires that piping systems be cleaned more often and/or some piping to be replaced sooner than otherwise expected. Oil and grease also hamper effective treatment at the wastewater treatment plant. Grease is the number one cause of foaming and bulking, especially Nocardia and M. parvicella.

Grease in a warm liquid may not appear harmful. But, as the liquid cools, the grease or fat congeals and causes nauseous mats on the surface of settling tanks, digesters, and the interior of pipes and other surfaces which may cause a shutdown of wastewater treatment units.

Bioaugmentation Solutions for Lift stations, Wet Wells and Collection Systems

Solid block biological products that are specifically formulated and packaged for use in lift stations and large restaurant grease traps to remove grease build-up and help increase degradation capabilities.

This biological product is a high strength formulation developed to degrade fats oils and grease quickly. It can be used in restaurants, grease traps and drain fields where food based grease is a problem.

This product is an improved biological product, specifically formulated and packaged for use in sewers to help degrade grease build-up and stop blockage.

we have a team of experienced individuals who come into your plant with a fresh pair of eyes. The system is checked from influent to effluent. System optimization, equipment efficiency and operational excellence are key components explored. Key Benefits Equipment efficiency Total Cost of Operation reductions Reliability and safety

An onsite audit is conducted to examine system parameters, process controls, and current monitor and control procedures. A physical walk-through is conducted, process flow diagrams are examined, previous design criteria are examined and current standard operating procedures are evaluated along with data logs.

United States
Environmental Protection
Agency
Office of Water
Washington, D.C.
EPA 832-F-00-073
September 2000
Collection Systems
Technology Fact Sheet
Sewers, Lift Station
DESCRIPTION
Wastewater lift stations are facilities designed to
move wastewater from lower to higher elevation
through pipes. Key elements of lift stations include
a wastewater receiving well (wet-well), often
equipped with a screen or grinding to remove
coarse materials; pumps and piping with associated
valves; motors; a power supply system; an
equipment control and alarm system; and an odor
control system and ventilation system.
Lift station equipment and systems are often
installed in an enclosed structure. They can be
constructed on-site (custom-designed) or prefabricated.
Lift station capacities range from
76 liters per minute (20 gallons per minute) to more
than 378,500 liters per minute (100,000 gallons per
minute). Pre-fabricated lift stations generally have
capacities of up to 38,000 liters per minute (10,000
gallons per minute). Centrifugal pumps are
commonly used in lift stations. A trapped air
column, or bubbler system, that senses pressure and
level is commonly used for pump station control.
Other control alternatives include electrodes placed
at cut-off levels, floats, mechanical clutches, and
floating mercury switches. A more sophisticated
control operation involves the use of variable speed
drives.
Lift stations are typically provided with equipment
for easy pump removal. Floor access hatches or
openings above the pump room and an overhead
monorail beam, bridge crane, or portable hoist are
commonly used.
The two most common types of lift stations are the
dry-pit or dry-well and submersible lift stations. In
dry-well lift stations, pumps and valves are housed
in a pump room (dry pit or dry-well), that is easily
accessible. The wet-well is a separate chamber
attached or located adjacent to the dry-well (pump
room) structure. Figures 1 and 2 illustrate the two
types of pumps.
Submersible lift stations do not have a separate
pump room; the lift station header piping,
associated valves, and flow meters are located in a
separate dry vault at grade for easy access.
Submersible lift stations include sealed pumps that
operate submerged in the wet-well. These are
removed to the surface periodically and reinstalled
using guide rails and a hoist. A key advantage of
dry-well lift stations is that they allow easy access
for routine visual inspection and maintenance. In
general, they are easier to repair than submersible
pumps. An advantage of submersible lift stations is
that they typically cost less than dry-well stations
and operate without frequent pump maintenance.
Submersible lift stations do not usually include
Dry Well
Wet Well
Inlet
Hoist
Discharge
Source: Qasim, 1994.
FIGURE 1 DRY-WELL PUMP
large aboveground structures and tend to blend in
with their surrounding environment in residential
areas. They require less space and are easier and
less expensive to construct for wastewater flow
capacities of 38,000 liters per minute (10,000
gallons per minute) or less.
APPLICABILITY
Lift stations are used to move wastewater from
lower to higher elevation, particularly where the
elevation of the source is not sufficient for gravity
flow and/or when the use of gravity conveyance
will result in excessive excavation depths and high
sewer construction costs.
Current Status
Lift stations are widely used in wastewater
conveyance systems. Dry-well lift stations have
been used in the industry for many years. However,
the current industry-wide trend is to replace drywell
lift stations of small and medium size
(typically less than 24,000 liters per minute or 6,350
gallons per minute) with submersible lift stations
mainly because of lower costs, a smaller footprint,
and simplified operation and maintenance.
Variable speed pumping is often used to optimize
pump performance and minimize power use.
Several types of variable-speed pumping equipment
are available, including variable voltage and
frequency drives, eddy current couplings, and
mechanical variable-speed drives. Variable-speed
pumping can reduce the size and cost of the wetwell
and allows the pumps to operate at maximum
efficiency under a variety of flow conditions.
Because variable-speed pumping allows lift station
discharge to match inflow, only nominal wet-well
storage volume is required and the well water level
is maintained at a near constant elevation.
Variable-speed pumping may allow a given flow
range to be achieved with fewer pumps than a
constant-speed alternative. Variable-speed stations
also minimize the number of pump starts and stops,
reducing mechanical wear. Although there is
significant energy saving potential for stations with
large friction losses, it may not justify the additional
capital costs unless the cost of power is relatively
high. Variable speed equipment also requires more
room within the lift station and may produce more
noise and heat than constant speed pumps.
Lift stations are complex facilities with many
auxiliary systems. Therefore, they are less reliable
than gravity wastewater conveyance. However, lift
station reliability can be significantly improved by
providing stand-by equipment (pumps and controls)
and emergency power supply systems. In addition,
lift station reliability is improved by using non-clog
pumps suitable for the particular wastewater quality
and by applying emergency alarm and automatic
control systems.
ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES
Advantages
Lift stations are used to reduce the capital cost of
sewer system construction. When gravity sewers
are installed in trenches deeper than three meters
(10 feet), the cost of sewer line installation
increases significantly because of the more complex
and costly excavation equipment and trench shoring
techniques required. The size of the gravity sewer
lines is dependent on the minimum pipe slope and
flow. Pumping wastewater can convey the same
flow using smaller pipeline size at shallower depth,
and thereby, reducing pipeline costs.
Hoist
Discharge
Source: Qasim, 1994.
FIGURE 2 WET-WELL SUBMERSIBLE
Disadvantages
Compared to sewer lines where gravity drives
wastewater flow, lift stations require a source of
electric power. If the power supply is interrupted,
flow conveyance is discontinued and can result in
flooding upstream of the lift station, It can also
interrupt the normal operation of the downstream
wastewater conveyance and treatment facilities.
This limitation is typically addressed by providing
an emergency power supply.
Key disadvantages of lift stations include the high
cost to construct and maintain and the potential for
odors and noise. Lift stations also require a
significant amount of power, are sometimes
expensive to upgrade, and may create public
concerns and negative public reaction.
The low cost of gravity wastewater conveyance and
the higher costs of building, operating, and
maintaining lift stations means that wastewater
pumping should be avoided, if possible and
technically feasible. Wastewater pumping can be
eliminated or reduced by selecting alternative sewer
routes or extending a gravity sewer using direction
drilling or other state-of-the-art deep excavation
methods. If such alternatives are viable, a costbenefit
analysis can determine if a lift station is the
most viable choice.
DESIGN CRITERIA
Cost effective lift stations are designed to: (1)
match pump capacity, type, and configuration with
wastewater quantity and quality; (2) provide
reliable and uninterruptible operation; (3) allow for
easy operation and maintenance of the installed
equipment; (4) accommodate future capacity
expansion; (5) avoid septic conditions and
excessive release of odors in the collection system
and at the lift station; (6) minimize environmental
and landscape impacts on the surrounding
residential and commercial developments; and (7)
avoid flooding of the lift station and the
surrounding areas.
Wet-well
Wet-well design depends on the type of lift station
configuration (submersible or dry-well) and the
type of pump controls (constant or variable speed).
Wet-wells are typically designed large enough to
prevent rapid pump cycling but small enough to
prevent a long detention time and associated odor
release.
Wet-well maximum detention time in constant
speed pumps is typically 20 to 30 minutes. Use of
variable frequency drives for pump speed control
allows wet-well detention time reduction to 5 to 15
minutes. The minimum recommended wet-well
bottom slope is to 2:1 to allow self-cleaning and
minimum deposit of debris. Effective volume of
the wet-well may include sewer pipelines,
especially when variable speed drives are used.
Wet-wells should always hold some level of sewage
to minimize odor release. Bar screens or grinders
are often installed in or upstream of the wet-well to
minimize pump clogging problems.
Wastewater Pumps
The number of wastewater pumps and associated
capacity should be selected to provide headcapacity
characteristics that correspond as nearly as
possible to wastewater quantity fluctuations. This
can be accomplished by preparing pump/pipeline
system head-capacity curves showing all conditions
of head (elevation of a free surface of water) and
capacity under which the pumps will be required to
operate.
The number of pumps to be installed in a lift station
depends on the station capacity, the range of flow
and the regulations. In small stations, with
maximum inflows of less than 2,640 liters per
minute (700 gallons per minute), two pumps are
customarily installed, with each unit able to meet
the maximum influent rate. For larger lift stations,
the size and number of pumps should be selected so
that the range of influent flow rates can be met
without starting and stopping pumps too frequently
and without excessive wet-well storage.
Depending on the system, the pumps are designed
to run at a reduced rate. The pumps may also
alternate to equalize wear and tear. Additional
pumps may provide intermediate capacities better
matched to typical daily flows. An alternative
option is to provide flow flexibility with variablespeed
pumps.
For pump stations with high head-losses, the singlepump
flow approach is usually the most suitable.
Parallel pumping is not as effective for such
stations because two pumps operating together yield
only slightly higher flows than one pump. If the
peak flow is to be achieved with multiple pumps in
parallel, the lift station must be equipped with at
least three pumps: two duty pumps that together
provide peak flow and one standby pump for
emergency backup. Parallel peak pumping is
typically used in large lift stations with relatively
flat system head curves. Such curves allow
multiple pumps to deliver substantially more flow
than a single pump. The use of multiple pumps in
parallel provides more flexibility.
Several types of centrifugal pumps are used in
wastewater lift stations. In the straight-flow
centrifugal pumps, wastewater does not change
direction as it passes through the pumps and into
the discharge pipe. These pumps are well suited for
low-flow/high head conditions. In angle-flow
pumps, wastewater enters the impeller axially and
passes through the volute casing at 90 degrees to its
original direction (Figure 3). This type of pump is
appropriate for pumping against low or moderate
heads. Mixed flow pumps are most viable for
pumping large quantities of wastewater at low head.
In these pumps, the outside diameter of the impeller
is less than an ordinary centrifugal pump, increasing
flow volume.
Ventilation
Ventilation and heating are required if the lift
station includes an area routinely entered by
personnel. Ventilation is particularly important to
prevent the collection of toxic and/or explosive
gases. According to the Nation Fire Protection
Association (NFPA) Section 820, all continuous
ventilation systems should be fitted with flow
detection devices connected to alarm systems to
indicate ventilation system failure. Dry-well
ventilation codes typically require six continuous
air changes per hour or 30 intermittent air changes
per hour. Wet-wells typically require 12 continuous
air changes per hour or 60 intermittent air changes
per hour. Motor control center (MCC) rooms
should have a ventilation system adequate to
provide six air changes per hour and should be air
conditioned to between 13 and 32 degrees Celsius
(55 to 90 degrees F). If the control room is
combined with an MCC room, the temperature
should not exceed 30 degrees C or 85 degrees F.
All other spaces should be designed for 12 air
changes per hour. The minimum temperature
should be 13 degrees C (55 degrees F) whenever
chemicals are stored or used.
Odor Control
Odor control is frequently required for lift stations.
A relatively simple and widely used odor control
alternative is minimizing wet-well turbulence. More
effective options include collection of odors
generated at the lift station and treating them in
scrubbers or biofilters or the addition of odor
control chemicals to the sewer upstream of the lift
station. Chemicals typically used for odor control
include chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, metal salts
(ferric chloride and ferrous sulfate) oxygen, air, and
potassium permanganate. Chemicals should be
Source: Lindeburg, revised edition 1995.
FIGURE 3 CENTRIFUGAL ANGLE-FLOW
PUMP
closely monitored to avoid affecting downstream
treatment processes, such as extended aeration.
Power Supply
The reliability of power for the pump motor drives
is a basic design consideration. Commonly used
methods of emergency power supply include
electric power feed from two independent power
distribution lines; an on-site standby generator; an
adequate portable generator with quick connection;
a stand-by engine driven pump; ready access to a
suitable portable pumping unit and appropriate
connections; and availability of an adequate holding
facility for wastewater storage upstream of the lift
station.
PERFORMANCE
The overall performance of a lift station depends on
the performance of the pumps. All pumps have
four common performance characteristics: capacity,
head, power, and overall efficiency. Capacity (flow
rate) is the quantity of liquid pumped per unit of
time, typically measured as gallons per minute
(gpm) or million gallons per day (mgd). Head is
the energy supplied to the wastewater per unit
weight, typically expressed as feet of water. Power
is the energy consumed by a pump per unit time,
typically measured as kilowatt-hours. Overall
efficiency is the ratio of useful hydraulic work
performed to actual work input. Efficiency reflects
the pump relative power losses and is usually
measured as a percentage of applied power.
Pump performance curves (Figure 4) are used to
define and compare the operating characteristics of
a pump and to identify the best combination of
performance characteristics under which a lift
station pumping system will operate under typical
conditions (flows and heads). Pump systems
operate at 75 to 85 percent efficiency most of the
time, while overall pump efficiency depends on the
type of installed pumps, their control system, and
the fluctuation of influent wastewater flow.
Performance optimization strategies focus on
different ways to match pump operational
characteristics with system flow and head
requirements. They may include the following
options: adjusting system flow paths installing
variable speed drives; using parallel pumps
installing pumps of different sizes trimming a pump
impeller; or putting a two-speed motor on one or
more pumps in a lift station. Optimizing system
performance may yield significant electrical energy
savings.
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
Lift station operation is usually automated and does
not require continuous on-site operator presence.
However, frequent inspections are recommended to
ensure normal functioning and to identify potential
problems. Lift station inspection typically includes
observation of pumps, motors and drives for
unusual noise, vibration, heating and leakage, check
of pump suction and discharge lines for valving
arrangement and leakage, check of control panel
switches for proper position, monitoring of
discharge pump rates and pump speed, and
monitoring of the pump suction and discharge
pressure. Weekly inspections are typically
conducted, although the frequency really depends
on the size of the lift station.
If a lift station is equipped with grinder bar screens
to remove coarse materials from the wastewater,
these materials are collected in containers and
disposed of to a sanitary landfill site as needed. If
the lift station has a scrubber system for odor
control, chemicals are supplied and replenished
typically every three months. If chemicals are
added for odor control ahead of the lift station, the
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0.35 0.4
Discharge (m3/s)
Head (m)
System Curve
Pump Curve
Source: Adapted from Roberson and Crowe, 1993.
FIGURE 4 PUMP PERFORMANCE CURVE
chemical feed stations should be inspected weekly
and chemicals replenished as needed.
The most labor-intensive task for lift stations is
routine preventive maintenance. A well-planned
maintenance program for lift station pumps
prevents unnecessary equipment wear and
downtime. Lift station operators must maintain an
inventory of critical spare parts. The number of
spare parts in the inventory depends on the critical
needs of the unit, the rate at which the part normally
fails, and the availability of the part. The operator
should tabulate each pumping element in the system
and its recommended spare parts. This information
is typically available from the operation and
maintenance manuals provided with the lift station.
COSTS
Lift station costs depend on many factors, including
(1) wastewater quality, quantity, and projections;
(2) zoning and land use planning of the area where
the lift station will be located; (3) alternatives for
standby power sources; (4) operation and
maintenance needs and support; (5) soil properties
and underground conditions; (6) required lift to the
receiving (discharge) sewer line; (7) the severity of
impact of accidental sewage spill upon the local
area; and (8) the need for an odor control system.
These site and system specific factors must be
examined and incorporated in preparing a lift
station cost estimate.
Construction Costs
The most important factors influencing cost are the
design lift station capacity and the installed pump
power. Another cost factor is the lift station
complexity. Factors which classify a lift station as
complex include two or more of the following: (1)
extent of excavation; (2) congested site and/or
restricted access; (3) rock excavation; (4) extensive
dewatering requirements, such as cofferdams; (5)
site conflicts, including modification or removal of
existing facilities; (6) special foundations, including
piling; (7) dual power supply and on-site switch
stations and emergency power generator; and (8)
high pumping heads (design heads in excess of
200 ft).
Mechanical, electrical, and control equipment
delivered to a pumping station construction site
typically account for 15 to 30 percent of total
construction costs. Lift station construction has a
significant economy-of-scale. Typically, if the
capacity of a lift station is increased 100 percent,
the construction cost would increase only 50 to 55
percent. An important consideration is that two
identical lift stations will cost 25 to 30 percent more
than a single station of the same combined capacity.
Usually, complex lift stations cost two to three
times more than more simple lift stations with no
construction complications.
Table 1 provides examples of complex lift stations
and associated construction costs in 1999 dollars.
TABLE 1 LIFT STATION CONSTRUCTION COSTS
Lift Station
Design Flowrate
(MGD)

Operation and Maintenance Costs
Lift station operation and maintenance costs include
power, labor, maintenance, and chemicals (if used
for odor control). Usually, the costs for solids
disposal are minimal, but are included if the lift
station is equipped with bar screens to remove
coarse materials from the wastewater. Typically,
power costs account for 85 to 95 percent of the total
operation and maintenance costs and are directly
proportional to the unit cost of power and the actual
power used by the lift station pumps. Labor costs
average 1 to 2 percent of total costs. Annual
maintenance costs vary, depending on the
complexity of the equipment and instrumentation.

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PUMP AND LIFTSTATION REPAIRS AND SERVICE
May 25th, 2010
ASAP Pump and Liftstation repairs and services

Jacksonville Duval County 904-346-1266
St Augustine St Johns County 904-824-7144
Orange Park Clay County 904-264-6444
Jacksonville Beaches Duval County 904-246-3969
Fernandina Nassau County 904-277-3040
Macclenny Baker County 904-259-5091
Palm Coast Flagler County 386-439-5290
Daytona Volusia County 386-253-4911
Serving all of Florida and Georgia at 904-346-1266

We can service all size pumps including well pumps water pumps, irrigation pumps, marine pumps, sewage pumps.

We also install and service all sizes of LIFTSTATIONS.

We are a licensed and certified LIFTSTATION OPERATOR.

CALL US FOR A FREE ESTIMATE.

MONTHLY MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS AVAILABLE

SERVING ALL OF FLORIDA AND GEORGIA

MONTHLY SERVICE AVAILABLE

MONTHLY SERVICE CONTRACTS

LIFT STATION INSPECTIONS

LICENSED LIFT STATION COMPANY

INSURED

FREE ESTIMATES

STATE OF FLORIDA CERTIFIED PLUMBING CONTRACTOR

CFCO56659

LIFT STATION PUMPS

LIFT STATION CRANE

CONTROL PANELS

RAILS

we have a team of experienced individuals who come into your plant OR BUSINESS with a fresh pair of eyes. The system is checked from influent to effluent. System optimization, equipment efficiency and operational excellence are key components explored. Key Benefits Equipment efficiency Total Cost of Operation reductions Reliability and safety

An onsite audit is conducted to examine system parameters, process controls, and current monitor and control procedures. A physical walk-through is conducted, process flow diagrams are examined, previous design criteria are examined and current standard operating procedures are evaluated along with data logs.

Plumbing

Drain Cleaning

High Pressure water jetting

Harben Water jetting

Sewer line replacement

Water line replacement

Fiber optic sewer video inpection service

We can insert a camera in your sewer line to see the problem before fixing it.

Backflow testing, installation, repair, and certification

Annual Backflow testing automated reminders. We will call you each year instead of you calling us.

Faucet replacement

Water Heater Replacement

24 Hour Emergency Service – We can help with all types of plumbing issues

Repiping – Repair Plumbing – Bath Remodeling
Drain jetting and video inspection of sewer lines

Toilets, Sinks Faucets, Tubs, Garbage Disposal, Etc.
Slab Leaks, Shower Pans, and Drain Cleaning
TV / Video Sewer Line Inspections
Kitchen and Bath Remodeling
New Construction Plumbing
Senior Citizen and Military Discount
Sewer and Water Service Replacements
Water Softeners
Water Heaters installed

We accept MasterCard, Visa and American Express

Water Heaters
Repair or replacement of most models, including the latest tank-less water heaters.
Kitchen and Lavatory Faucets
Repair or replacement of faucets including special order faucets and designer faucets
Water Closets
Repair or replacement of water closets (toilets) including special order items
Sewer and Septic Service
We offer sewer conversion from septic to city sewer. This includes not only the installation of piping, but the repair of any broken sprinkler lines and sod replacement. We carry company-owned medium equipment for excavation and the latest technologies for septic to sewer conversion.
Complete Hot and Cold Water Repipes
We offer complete repipes including the replacement of hot water heaters, hose bibs, washer boxes and ice maker boxes. We have drywall and tile replacement staff on-site.
Bath Remodel Specialist
We staff bathroom remodel experts who can design and complete all bathroom remodel jobs, big or small. Our company has its own drywall and tile specialist.
Water Softeners
We offer repair, replacement and installations of water softeners and filters with the latest in digital and mechanical timers.

Licensed Lift Station operator, we can repair, install and perform mandated monthly lift station inspections.

Utility services, and underground utility installations.

Septic tank operator, we can service your septic system, we can install your drain field or septic system and we can maintain it for you.

LP Gas piping and repairs, natural gas piping and repairs, appliance repairs, boilers, water heaters, tankless water heaters, pool heaters, pool pumps, gas generators, medical gas piping, nitrogen gas piping, oxygen gas piping, med gas piping, manometer test, annual gas testing and inspections, splash guards, plumbing, free estimates, licensed and insured.

New construction, alterations, repairs, commercial, industrial, residential, medical, and hospitals…..all work is very welcome and appreciated.

We accept all major credit cards. Visa, Mastercard, Discover and American Express.

FOR MORTGAGE COMPANIES WE CAN INSPECT ALL PHASES OF WORKMANSHIP AND QUALITY CONTROL, FREE ESTIMATES, LICENSED AND INSURED.

Proper well construction and continued maintenance are keys to the safety of your water supply. Your state water-well contractor licensing agency, local health department, or local water system professional can provide information on well construction.

The well should be located so rainwater flows away from it. Rainwater can pick up harmful bacteria and chemicals on the land’s surface. If this water pools near your well, it can seep into it, potentially causing health problems.

To keep your well safe, you must be sure possible sources of contamination are not close by. Experts suggest the following distances as a minimum for protection — farther is better (see graphic on the right):

Septic Tanks, 50 feet
Livestock yards, Silos, Septic Leach Fields, 50 feet
Patroleum Tanks, Liquid-Tight Manure Storage and Fertilizer Storage and Handling, 100 feet
Manure Stacks, 250 feet

Many homeowners tend to forget the value of good maintenance until problems reach crisis levels. That can be expensive. It’s better to maintain your well, find problems early, and correct them to protect your well’s performance. Keep up-to-date records of well installation and repairs plus pumping and water tests. Such records can help spot changes and possible problems with your water system. If you have problems, ask a local expert to check your well construction and maintenance records. He or she can see if your system is okay or needs work.

Protect your own well area. Be careful about storage and disposal of household and lawn care chemicals and wastes. Good farmers and gardeners minimize the use of fertilizers and pesticides. Take steps to reduce erosion and prevent surface water runoff. Regularly check underground storage tanks that hold home heating oil, diesel, or gasoline. Make sure your well is protected from the wastes of livestock, pets, and wildlife.

Drilled Wells

Drilled wells penetrate about 100-400 feet into the bedrock. Where

you find bedrock at the surface, it is commonly called ledge. To

serve as a water supply, a drilled well must intersect bedrock

fractures containing ground water.

Drilled Well Construction Features

diameter that extends into the bedrock to prevent shallow

ground water from entering the well. By law, the casing has

to extend at least 18 feet into the ground, with at least five

feet extending into the bedrock. The casing should also extend a foot or two above the ground’s

surface. A sealant, such as cement grout or bentonite clay, should be poured along the outside of

the casing to the top of the well. The well is capped to prevent surface water from entering the

well.

The casing is usually metal or plastic pipe, six inches in

Wells with a shallow water table may feature a jet pump located inside the home. Pumps require

special wiring and electrical service. Well pumps should be installed and serviced by a qualified

professional registered with your state.

Submersible pumps, located near the bottom of the well, are most commonly used in drilled wells.

point where the discharge water line leaves the well to enter your home. The device attaches

directly to the casing below the frost line and provides a watertight subsurface connection,

protecting the well from frost and contamination.

Most modern drilled wells incorporate a pitless adapter designed to provide a sanitary seal at the

10- or 12- inches in diameter, and covered with a concrete well cap either at or below the

ground’s surface. This outmoded type of construction does not provide the same degree of

protection from surface contamination. Also, older wells may not have a pitless adapter to provide

a seal at the point of discharge from the well.

Older drilled wells may lack some of these sanitary features. The well pipe used was often eight-,

Hydrofracting A Drilled Well

Hydrofracting is a process that applies water or air under pressure into your well to open up existing

fractures near your well and can even create new ones. Often this can increase the yield of your well.

This process can be applied to new wells with insufficient yield and to improve the quantity of older wells.

Driven Well Construction Features

Assembled lengths of two inches to three inches diameter metal pipes are driven into the ground.

A screened “well point” located at the end of the pipe helps drive the pipe through the sand and

gravel. The screen allows water to enter the well and filters out sediment.

The pump for the well is in one of two places: on top of the well or in the house. An access pit is

usually dug around the well down to the frost line and a water discharge pipe to the house is

joined to the well pipe with a fitting.

The well and pit are capped with the same kind of large-diameter concrete tile used for a dug

Driven Wells

Like dug wells, driven wells pull water from the water-saturated

zone above the bedrock. Driven wells can be deeper than dug

wells. They are typically 30 to 50 feet deep and are usually

located in areas with thick sand and gravel deposits where the

ground water table is within 15 feet of the ground’s surface. In the

proper geologic setting, driven wells can be easy and relatively

inexpensive to install.

Although deeper than dug wells, driven wells are still relatively

shallow and have a moderate-to-high risk of contamination from

nearby land activities.

Dug Wells

Dug wells are holes in the ground dug by shovel or backhoe.

Historically, a dug well was excavated below the groundwater

table until incoming water exceeded the digger’s bailing rate. The

well was then lined (cased) with stones, brick, tile, or other

material to prevent collapse. It was covered with a cap of wood,

stone, or concrete. Since it is so difficult to dig beneath the ground

water table, dug wells are not very deep. Typically, they are only

10 to 30 feet deep. Being so shallow, dug wells have the highest

risk of becoming contaminated. To minimize the likelihood of

contamination, your dug well should have certain features. These

features help to prevent contaminants from traveling along the

outside of the casing or through the casing and into the well.

Dug Well Construction Features

The well should be cased with a watertight material (for example, tongue-and-groove precast

concrete) and a cement grout or bentonite clay sealant poured along the outside of the casing to

the top of the well.

The well should be covered by a concrete curb and cap that stands about a foot above the

ground.

The land surface around the well should be mounded so that surface water runs away from the

well and is not allowed to pond around the outside of the wellhead.

Ideally, the pump for your well should be inside your home or in a separate pump house, rather

older homes, dug before drilling equipment was readily available or when drilling was considered too

expensive. If you have a dug well on your property and are using it for drinking water, check to make sure

it is properly covered and sealed. Another problem relating to the shallowness of a dug well is that it may

go dry during a drought when the ground water table drops

Drain and Pipe Cleaning
This service includes not only the drain being cleaned by using mechanical means, but we also use the latest in camera equipment to view the drain line to locate and pin point specific problems in the drain line, thus eliminating unwanted excavation. We also utilize a fog machine capable of putting fog or smoke into the drain and vent systems to locate leaks. We carry the newest listening device for pin pointing leaks underground, inside and outside of your home or business.
tankless water heaters
toilets
shower pans
ceramic tile installers
floor drains
backflow preventer or preventor
shower head
jacuzzi tub
roman tub
roman shower valve
hand held shower valve
sinks
toilets
water closets
urinals
bidets
water fountains
faucets
tub
meter
shut off valves
washing machine box
washing machine connection
hose bibb
clean out
sewer line
hot and cold water repipes
insta hot
instant hot water
water heater
boilers
dishwasher connections
soap dispenser
pot filler
cast iron sink
water saving toilets
drinking fountain
body spa
spa
whirlpool tub
soap dish
toilet rack
flushometer
hand dryer
partitions

We service the following areas of northeast Florida:Jacksonville, Jacksonville Beach, Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fernandina, Amelia Island, Callahan, Yulee, Hillard, Macclenny, St George, St Marys, Kingsland, Orange Park, Middleburg, Green Cove Springs, Penny Farms, St Augustine, Hastings, Palatka, Keystone Heights, Starke, Lake City, Waldo, Baldwin, St Augustine Beach, Crescent Beach, Palm Coast, Daytona, Holly Hill, Titusville, Daytona Shores, Ormond Beach, Bunnell, Deland, Orange City, Port Orange, Orlando, New Smyrna Beach, Sanford, Palm Valley, Fruitcove, Mandarin, Lawtey, St. Augustine Beach, Switzerland, Vilano Beach, Marineland, Flagler Beach, Beverly Beach, Sanderson, and Glen St. Mary.

STATE CERTIFIED CONTRACTOR LICENSE NUMBER CFCO56659

STATE CERTIFIED GENERAL CONTRACTOR CGC1504600

NOW HIRING

apply for a job online at www.asapapply.com

CLICK BELOW AND PLACE A WORK ORDER

IN OUR AUTOMATED WORK ORDER SYSTEM

http://www.asap-plumbing.com/Submit_a_New_Work_Order/submit_a_new_work_order.php

We accept all major credit cards. Visa, Mastercard, Discover and American Express.

We service the following areas of northeast Florida: Jacksonville, Jacksonville Beach, Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fernandina, Amelia Island, Callahan, Yulee, Hillard, Macclenny, St George, St Marys, Kingsland, Orange Park, Middleburg, Green Cove Springs, Penny Farms, St Augustine, Hastings, Palatka, Keystone Heights, Starke, Lake City, Waldo, Baldwin, St Augustine Beach, Crescent Beach, Palm Coast, Daytona, Holly Hill, Titusville, Daytona Shores, Ormond Beach, Bunnell, Deland, Orange City, Port Orange, Orlando, New Smyrna Beach, Sanford, Palm Valley, Fruitcove, Mandarin, Lawtey, St. Augustine Beach, Switzerland, Vilano Beach, Marineland, Flagler Beach, Beverly Beach, Sanderson, and Glen St. Mary.

STATE CERTIFIED CONTRACTOR LICENSE NUMBER CFCO56659

STATE CERTIFIED GENERAL CONTRACTOR CGC1504600

NOW HIRING

apply for a job online at www.asapapply.com

CLICK BELOW AND PLACE A WORK ORDER

IN OUR AUTOMATED WORK ORDER SYSTEM

http://www.asap-plumbing.com/Submit_a_New_Work_Order/submit_a_new_work_order.php

Serving the entire Jacksonville area including the following communities:

Argyle Forest
Arlington
Asbury Lake
Avondale
Baldwin
Bayard
Baymeadows
Beauclerc
Bryceville
Callahan
Cecil Field
Cedar Point
Cunningham
Dinsmore
Durkeeville
Five Points
Fruit Cove
Ft Caroline
Golfair
Greater Jacksonville
Herlong
Hidden Hills
Hilliard
Jacksonville
Jacksonville Beach
Jacksonville Heights
Jacksonville International Airport
Julington Creek
Lake Shore
Lakeside
Loretto
Macclenney
Mandarin
Marietta
Maxville
Middleburg
Murray Hill
New Berlin
Nocotee
Northside Jacksonville
Oak Leaf
Ocean Way
Ortega
Palencia
Palm Valley
Pecan Park
Pottsburg Creek
Queens Harbor
Riverside
San Jose
San Marco
Soutel
Southbank
Southpoint
Southside Jacksonville
Springfield
St Johns
St Nicholas
Starke
Switzerland
Talbot Island
Tallyrand
Timuquana
Westside Jacksonville
Whitehouse
World Golf Village
Yulee

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As the largest city in land area in the contiguous United States, Jacksonville is divided both formally and informally into a few large sections. Though most residents divide the city into Northside, Southside, Westside, and—increasingly over the past decade, Arlington—Jacksonville’s official website divides the city into six major sections:[1]

Sections of Jacksonville

Greater Arlington, more commonly known to Jacksonville citizens simply as Arlington, is situated east and south of the St. Johns River and north of Beach Blvd.
North Jacksonville is officially designated by the city website as everything north of the St. Johns & Trout Rivers and east of US 1. Much of this area is known by Jacksonville residents as the Northside, though much of what is called “Northside” does not fall within these boundaries, and much of what falls within these boundaries has not been traditionally known as “Northside”.
Northwest Jacksonville is located north of Interstate 10, south of the Trout River and surrounds the downtown section. The parts of this area between US Highway 1 and the Trout and St. John’s River is usually considered part of either the “Northside” or, alternately, Downtown. Much of this section is actually rural land, not easily classified as part of any section.
Southeast Jacksonville, almost universally known as Southside, refers to everything east of the St. Johns River and south of Beach Blvd.
Southwest Jacksonville makes up most of what is known in Jacksonville as the Westside, though parts of Northwest Jacksonville also are considered part of the “Westside”. It consists of everything west of the St. Johns River and south of Interstate 10.
The Urban Core, most of which is commonly known as Downtown, includes the south & north banks of the narrowest part of the St. Johns River east from the Fuller Warren Bridge and extending roughly 4 miles (6.4 km) north and east.

With the rapid growth in the eastern part of Duval County, the Intracoastal/Beaches/Ponte Vedra area is viewed by many as a major section as well, but is not generally included in a Jacksonville list since they lie outside of the Jacksonville city limits. There is also a distinct part of the city known as “Eastside” which those unfamiliar with Jacksonville’s overall geography sometimes mistakenly regard as one of the major divisions of town, rather than the localized neighborhood which it is.

Today, what distinguishes a “section” of Jacksonville from a “neighborhood” is primarily a matter of size and divisibility. However, definitions are imprecise, and sometimes not universally agreed upon.[2]

Each of these sections not only encompasses a large area, but also, each is divided into many neighborhoods. Each of these neighborhoods, in turn, has its own identity.

Each of these sections is divided into many neighborhoods. Some of these neighborhoods, such as Mandarin and LaVilla, had existed previously as independent towns or villages, prior to consolidation, and have their own histories.
Contents

[hide]

1 Sections
1.1 North Jacksonville
1.1.1 Sandalwood
1.2 Southeast Jacksonville
1.2.1 Bayard
1.2.2 Baymeadows
1.2.3 Lakewood
1.2.4 Loretto
1.2.5 Mandarin
1.2.6 San Marco
1.2.7 Sunbeam
1.3 Southwest Jacksonville
1.3.1 Argyle
1.3.2 Avondale
1.3.3 Cedar Hills
1.3.4 Confederate Point
1.3.5 Lake Shore
1.3.6 Marietta
1.3.7 Normandy
1.3.8 Ortega
1.3.9 Paxon
1.3.10 Riverside
1.3.11 Whitehouse
1.4 Northwest Jacksonville
1.4.1 Panama Park
1.4.2 North Shore
1.5 Urban core
1.5.1 LaVilla
1.5.2 Southside
1.5.3 Springfield
2 References
3 External links

Sections
North Jacksonville
Sandalwood

The Sandalwood neighborhood began developing in the spring of 1960, midway between downtown Jacksonville and the beaches, or about 6 miles (9.7 km) from each, was advertised in 1960-61 as “On the Southside – halfway between business and pleasure!” The builder-developer, Pearce-Uible, was located at 3850 Beach Blvd.

The original neighborhood was bordered by the then two-lane Atlantic Boulevard on the north, a mile of palmetto and scrub on the south before reaching Beachwood neighborhood and Beach Boulevard, the western part of the neighborhood was bordered by the less than two-lane dirt road named St. John’s Bluff, and the eastern border of the neighborhood was defined by a storm drainage ditch called the Sandalwood Canal. The original streets are named after mostly South Pacific islands and most of the streets are, from north to south, in alphabetical order. The original street names are Aloha Drive; Batavia Drive; Caledonia Drive; Delago Drive; Eniwetok Drive; Fiji Court; Hawaii Drive East; Hawaii Drive South; Indies Drive North; Indies Drive East; Indies Drive South; Java Drive; Kuralei Drive; Mindanao Drive (The main drag); Sandalwood Boulevard (Original main entrance road); Bahia Drive; Dulawan Drive; and Kusaie Drive.

The were eight original home styles named as follows: Aloha; Bahama; Bikini; Caledonia; Del ray; Java; Polynesian; and Waikiki. Free airplane rides over Sandalwood were offered during the grand opening. The entrance and sales office located on Sandalwood Boulevard boasted a winding, palm lined street, and adjacent play area for the children. Homes were priced from $11,400 to $16,000, with monthly payments as low as $67. The original Sandalwood consisted of approximately 500 homes. The first families purchased homes in May and June 1960. Many of the first families were U.S. Navy families who were stationed at the Mayport base and others were employed by CSX railroad.

In the late 1970s, additional construction began at the southern border by the Sofranko Homes company, nearly doubling the size of the neighborhood. Most of the original early 1960s families have moved away over the years, but a handful of the original families are still left from the early 1960s.
Southeast Jacksonville

Neighborhoods include Arrowhead, Avenues, Bayard, Baymeadows, Baymeadows Center, Beach Haven, Beauclerc, Bowden, Brackridge, Brierwood, Craven, Deercreek, Deerwood, Deerwood Center, Del Rio, Englewood, Goodbys Creek, Greenfield Manor, Greenland, Isle of Palms, Julington Creek, Kilarney Shores, Lakewood, Loretto, Mandarin, Mandarin Station, Miramar, Montclair, Pickwick Park, Pine Forrest, Royal Lakes, San Jose, San Jose Forrest, San Marco, Sans Pareil, Sans Souci, Secret Cove, South Riverside, Southpoint, Southwood, Spring Park, Sunbeam, Tiger Hole and Windy Hill.
Bayard

Bayard has a rich history that antedates its inclusion in the municipality of Jacksonville. For more information, see Bayard.
Baymeadows

Baymeadows is a relatively affluent neighborhood centered around Baymeadows Road. It is situated south of Arlington (specifically, south of J. Turner Butler Boulevard) and east of Mandarin. A center for white-collar employment, it is home to many corporate office parks, upscale apartment complexes and residential developments, two private golf courses, several shopping centers and a large shopping mall. Deerwood and Hampton Glen and East Hampton and Reedy Branch Deercreek
Lakewood

Lakewood, which lies in the area where San Jose Blvd. and University Blvd intersect, is a residential area with houses built in the 1950s. It has several churches, two shopping centers, and a plethora of streets named after major private colleges, such as Clemson, Cornell, Fordham, and Emory.
Loretto

Loretto is a distinct part of the greater Mandarin area, and sits between San Jose Boulevard to the west and Philips Highway to the east. It is bordered to the north by Interstate 295 and to the south by the county line. Loretto was formed by the Catholic Diocese of St. Augustine. In the days of Reconstruction, Loretto sprouted up next to the nuns’ convent, dormitory and school. It is on what became Old St. Augustine Road, the highway between Jacksonville and St. Augustine. According to Wayne Wood’s Jacksonville’s Architectural Heritage, the nuns were sent there to educate both the residents and newly freed slaves. The Catholic Church still owns the property on all four corners of the intersection of St. Augustine Road and Loretto/Greenland Roads. The Loretto area public schools always have been highly regarded; on the FCAT, they’re all rated A, B or C. The average price for homes that become available in Loretto is just under $200K. Many homes are built on some of the largest new construction lots in the area and there are a lot of dead-end streets and cul-de-sacs. Over the length of San Jose Boulevard, residents can find just about every merchant, service or restaurant available in the city. Loretto has a solid, hometown feel, with established neighborhoods, parks and nature areas nearby, making it the proverbial middle America.
Mandarin

Mandarin has a rich history that antedates its inclusion in the municipality of Jacksonville. For more information, see Mandarin.

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Mandarin, Jacksonville, Florida

Mandarin is a neighborhood located in the southern most portion of Jacksonville, in Duval County, Florida, United States. It is located on the eastern banks of the St. Johns River, across from Orange Park. Mandarin was named after the Mandarin orange in 1830 by Calvin Reed, a prominent resident of the area .

Once called “a tropical paradise” by author Harriett Beecher Stowe, the quaint area of Mandarin is marked by its history, ancient oak trees draped with Spanish moss, beautiful parks, marinas and more water views than any other area in Jacksonville. In the 1800s, Mandarin was a small farming village that shipped oranges, grapefruit, lemons and other fruits and vegetables to Jacksonville and points north on the steamships that traveled the St. Johns River. In 1864, the Union steamship, the Maple Leaf, hit a Confederate mine and sank just off Mandarin Point.

While Mandarin now is just a small section of the City of Jacksonville, its natural beauty, parks and historic buildings draw visitors from around the world. Just a short drive south of Jacksonville’s city center, the community is bordered by Beauclerc to the north, Julington Creek to the south and St. John’s River to the west.
Contents

[hide]

1 History
1.1 Harriet Beecher Stowe
1.2 Famous Residents
1.3 20th Century
2 Geography
3 References
4 External links

History
Harriet Beecher Stowe
Main article: Palmetto Leaves

In 1867 the famous author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe bought a cottage here. For the next seventeen winters, she welcomed tourists debarking from the steamers making their way down the St. Johns River and charged them 75 cents each to meet her and admire her surroundings.

Stowe, although best known for her novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin about the cruelty of slavery, also wrote about Florida.

She had promised her Boston publisher another novel, but was so taken with northeast Florida that she produced instead a series of sketches of the land and the people which she submitted in 1872 under the title Palmetto Leaves. Her second book did not outsell her first novel, but did have the effect of drawing rich and fashionable tourists to visit her.

In Palmetto Leaves Stowe describes life in Florida in the latter half of the 19th century; “a tumble-down, wild, panicky kind of life—this general happy-go-luckiness which Florida inculcates.” Her idyllic sketches of picnicking, sailing, and river touring expeditions and simple stories of events and people in this tropical “winter summer” land became the first unsolicited promotional writing to interest northern tourists in Florida.[1]

A small chapel is dedicated to Harriet Beecher Stowe in Mandarin.
Famous Residents

The late Allen Collins from the rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd resided some of his last years in Mandarin before he passed. Mandarin was also the location where Allen was involved in a car accident during 1986 that left him paralyzed from the waist down and his girlfriend dead.
20th Century

In 1968, the city of Jacksonville and most of Duval County formed a consolidated municipal unit. As part of this process, Mandarin ceased to exist as a political entity, and became part of the City of Jacksonville.

In 1990, with the rapid growth of Mandarin, a new public high school was opened in the area. Several prominent citizens in Jacksonville urged that the new school be named Harriet Beecher Stowe High School, but the proposal did not receive widespread acceptance, and instead the school was simply named, Mandarin High School.
Geography

Mandarin is located at 30°09′37″N 81°39′34″WCoordinates: 30°09′37″N 81°39′34″W (30.1603, -81.6594).[2] / 30.1603°N 81.6594°W / 30.1603; -81.6594 / 30.1603°N 81.6594°W / 30.1603; -81.6594
References

^ “Palmetto Leaves”. University Press of Florida. http://www.upf.com/Spring1999/stowe.html. Retrieved 2006-09-06.
^ “US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990″. United States Census Bureau. 2005-05-03. http://www.census.gov/geo/www/gazetteer/gazette.html. Retrieved 2008-01-31.

External links

Map of Mandarin, 1917
Palmetto Leaves
Mandarin Museum & Historical Society

San Marco

San Marco is a relatively small and generally upscale neighborhood located south of Downtown and north of Mandarin. Due to large differences in property value, income distribution, and reported crime statistics in a relatively small area, San Marco is diverse. In one block, residences range from low cost, multi-family dwellings to sprawling riverside mansions. It is an area of historical and cultural significance in Jacksonville, and its inhabitants and proprietors identify strongly with their community.

Known as a trendy area, the most identifying feature of San Marco is “the Square,” an artsy shopping, dining, and entertainment district; its galleries, restaurants, and boutiques are overwhelmingly independently owned, operated, and supported which lends to its vogue. Visitors of the Square are likely to see polite intermingling between young professionals, landed gentry, “scenesters,” and “starving artists.”

Common landmarks are its large statue of three lions and the Art Deco styled San Marco Theater.
Sunbeam

Sunbeam is a relatively new neighborhood centered around Sunbeam Road which runs east/west between Philips Highway and San Jose Boulevard. It is situated south of Baymeadows Road, east of Mandarin and north of the Avenues Mall. The area includes the site of the former Sunbeam Sanitary Landfill which opened in 1972. The dump emitted objectionable odors, which discouraged development nearby. The landfill permit expired in 1986, and the facility stopped accepting garbage. After being covered with a 3-foot (0.91 m) deep cap, which prevents the elements from coming in and waste from coming out, the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation (FDER) certified it closed on October 21, 1992. [3] With the odor problem resolved, development resumed in the middle 1990’s including subdivisions, apartment complexes, commercial buildings and the Community Hospice of Northeast Florida center. A golf course on and around the original landfill was planned and delayed for several years but construction finally began in late 2007 and projected to open in Fall, 2008. However, the financial meltdown delayed opening. At the end of 2009, the course was substantially complete but work on a clubhouse had not commenced.
Southwest Jacksonville

.[4]..[5]. Neighborhoods include Argyle, Avondale, Cedar Hills, Cedar Hills Estates, Chimney Lakes, Confederate Point, Duclay, Duclay Forest, Fairfax, Herlong, Hillcrest, Hyde Park, Jax Farms, Jacksonville Heights, Lakeshore, Maxville, McGirts Creek, Murray Hill, Normandy Manor, Normandy Village, Oak Hill, Ortega, Ortega Farms, Ortega Forest, Ortega Hills, Otis, Riverside, Rolling Hills, Settlers Landing, Sweetwater, Venetia, Wesconnett, Whitehouse, Yukon and West Jacksonville.

The Westside is home to Paxon School for Advanced Studies, which happens to be one of the top schools in the nation by academics since 2003. The Westside is also home to some of the most culturally diverse schools in Duval County to date.
Argyle

One of the newest and largest neighborhoods on Jacksonville’s Westside, and occupying a large area of former ranchland, Argyle has grown rapidly from its beginnings in the mid-1980s. Straddling the Duval/Clay county line, Argyle was originally accessible only from Blanding Boulevard in Orange Park. However, as it has expanded westward, Argyle is now connected to Jacksonville’s far-Westside by a number of roads, including the Brannan Field-Chaffee Road corridor that links I-10 directly with Middleburg. Argyle remains a popular choice for middle-class families that are recently settling in Jacksonville.
Avondale

Historic Avondale lies along the St. John’s River southwest of the Riverside area, some three to four miles (6 km) upriver from downtown Jacksonville. Avondale is known for its quiet, tree-lined residential streets and hundreds of quaint homes, most dating from the early 1920s during the Great Florida Land Boom. A few Avondale homes pre-date 1900. Most homes in the neighborhood reflect the middle to upper income taste in residential architecture of the 1920s, including numerous Prairie School, Art Deco, Craftsman Style, Classical Revival, and Mediterranean Revival styles. Avondale is characterized by numerous bungalows and spacious, graceful homes. Unlike some other neighborhoods, Avondale never experienced a period of decline during the latter 20th Century, and retains much of its original gentility.

Two-lane St. John’s Avenue is the key traffic artery through Avondale, and is the location of the Avondale Shops, a small but vibrant collection of specialty shops, clothing stores, cafes, and upscale restaurants, most of which are located in original 1920s structures.

The Avondale Historic District is a U.S. historic district in Jacksonville, Florida. It is bounded by Roosevelt Boulevard, Belvedere Avenue, Seminole Road, the St. Johns River, and Talbot Avenue, encompasses approximately 2730 acres, and contains 729 historic buildings. On July 6, 1989, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.
Cedar Hills

Cedar Hills lies along the Cedar River (called Cedar Creek by the locals), on the opposite shore from Lake Shore, and stretches from Blanding Boulevard on the east to Lane Avenue to the west. Built in the 1940s, Cedar Hills consists of some 3,000 single-family brick or concrete block homes in seven different residential neighborhoods that are anchored by the Cedar Hills Shopping Center business district. Most of the homes are modest, although many of the homes along the shore of the Cedar River have been greatly expanded, or replaced with much larger homes.
Confederate Point

Built in the 1960s on reclaimed lowlands, technically a small island surrounded by a moat, with one small bridge as access. Confederate Point lies along the Cedar River (called Cedar Creek by the locals), on the opposite shore from Lake Shore. Confederate Point stretches from the Ortega River to the east, to Blanding Boulevard on the West, and is bordered by the Cedar River to the North, and Timaquana Boulevard to the South. The area consists of approximately 300 large, single family homes, and approximately 700 condos and apartments that line the south bank of the Cedar River. All of the single family homes are inland, with the apartments and condos lining the shore of the Cedar River. The area is popular given that it is close to water, and Downtown, yet also exclusive in that there is only one road in or out.
Lake Shore

Built during the time of the first World War, Lake Shore lies on the curving north bank of the Cedar River (called Cedar Creek by the locals), and stretches from Roosevelt Boulevard on the east, to the Cedar River to the West, and is bordered by the Cedar River to the South, and Park Street to the North, and is bisected by Cassat Avenue. Lake Shore consists of approximately 1,000 modest, wood-frame, concrete block or brick homes, with the exception of approximately 80 quite large estates that line the shore of the Cedar River. The neighborhood is anchored by the Roosevelt Plaza on Roosevelt Boulevard, and the Lake Shore business district of stores up and down Cassat Avenue. Lake Shore is centrally located on the Westside, with quick access to Downtown Jacksonville via Roosevelt Boulevard. Given the small size of the existing homes, the current trend is for first time home buyers to renovate and retrofit these well built homes to fit today’s needs. This is a very well maintained pocket of 1940s and 1950s homes. There is a definite trend to renovate and revitalize this quiet, comfortable neighborhood.
Marietta

Marietta is one of the small farming communities that was absorbed during the 1968 consolidation of Jacksonville with Duval County. Though technically a part of the city proper today, much of Marietta still retains its small-town, and even rural “feel”, with some old-style farms and ranches, and most homes occupying lots of 10 acres (40,000 m2) or more, on which they keep horses and cattle, or raise grain and maintain orchards. Marietta is popular with old Southern families, and new families who moved to Jacksonville from mid-western agricultural states. Companies looking for more space have also found Marietta. The area west of Marietta and east of Whitehouse along Beaver Street is now home to the Publix warehouse, Michael’s warehouse and the Winn-Dixie distribution center.
Normandy

Outside of what would eventually become Jacksonville, and originally called “Hogan Settlement”, The Normandy area was settled by Jacksonville’s “Founding Family”, the “Hogan’s” who were the first white settlers in Duval County. The Normandy area is a large swath of forested high-ground that straddles both sides of Normandy Boulevard, and stretches from Cassat Avenue on the East, out to Herlong Airfield on the West, and is bordered by I-10 to the North, and Wilson Road to the South. Though originally populated by the large ranches of many of Duval County’s founding families such as the Hogans, Lindseys, Fourakers, and the Herlongs, the area is now a bedroom community, containing over a dozen large residential neighborhoods such as Normandy, Normandy Village, Rolling Hills, Country Creek, Crystal Springs, Hyde Grove, Hyde Park, etc, with very few apartment complexes or condo developments. These neighborhoods have their own sewer and water plants, and unlike most wood-constructed homes in Jacksonville’s newer neighborhoods, most homes in the Normandy area are constructed of brick, or concrete block. The area is home to some of the city’s best schools, and parks. Unlike other sections of the city, where people tend to move from home to home every 2 or 3 years; homes in the Normandy area are routinely transferred from generation to generation, and it is not unusual for great-grandchildren to live in homes originally built by their great-grandparents.[6].
Ortega

Historic Ortega lies on the St Johns River just south of the historic Riverside area. Ortega is bordered by the St. Johns River on the East, the Cedar River on the North, and the Ortega river on the West, practically making it an “inland island.” The history of the area includes a number of interesting characters: botanist William Bartram; highwayman and cattle rustler Daniel McGirtt; and Don Juan McQueen, who attempted to establish a plantation on his 1791 Ortega land grant, but was forced to leave due to attacks of Georgians and the French. Gangster George “Machine Gun” Kelly and his wife were rumored to be the mysterious couple who abruptly left their rented Grand Avenue home hours before a midnight police raid in 1933. Ortega is home to hundreds of mid-size to large, turn-of-the-century homes and Southern Style mansions. Many of these homes are situated directly on the river, and the nature of the “island” allows ease of access to the waterways for all residents. Along with Avondale and Riverside, Ortega is home to some of the wealthiest of Jacksonville families. It is marked by a distinctly traditional Southern culture complete with one of the South’s most exclusive debutante coiteries. The island is almost exclusively residential, the only exception being a small square in the section known as “Old Ortega” on the northern end where a small collection of restaurants, boutiques, and a pharmacy are found. Ortega, with its giant oaks, waterfront mansions, and series of parks is widely considered one of the most beautiful residential areas of Northeast Florida.
Paxon

Platted in the 1920s and 30’s, the Paxon area is one of the oldest, pre-platted neighborhoods in Jacksonville. Built due to the redistribution of housing after the Great Fire, the Paxon area replaced the many thousands of homes that were destroyed in the Great Fire with thousands of modest, wood-framed homes. The Paxon area was extensively well-planned with its own schools (originally known as Paxon Sr. High School and Paxon Jr. High School, along with a half-dozen small elementary schools). The area straddles Edgewood Avenue South, and stretches from Mcduff Avenue to the East, and I-295 to the West, and is bordered by I-10 to the South, and I-295 to the North. The area originally contained over 40,000 single family homes in over 15 different residential neighborhoods, all anchored by the Edgewood Avenue, and Beaver Street business districts. However, over time, the area declined due to the small average size of the homes, and many of those homes were destroyed, and replaced with warehouses and mixed industry. Despite the new industrialization of the area overall, there are still many thousands of occupied homes in the Paxon area. Paxon Senior High School has been converted into a magnet school—it is now known as Paxon School for Advanced Studies—which has been listed by Forbes Magazine as one of the top three high schools in the United States for the last four years.[citation needed]
Riverside
Whitehouse

The community of Whitehouse was originally founded due to its close proximity to NAS Cecil Field, with most residents being active Navy personnel or civilian employees at the facility. When the federal government closed Cecil Field in 1999, the leaving military workers were replaced by civilian workers at the Cecil Commerce Center. The area east of Whitehouse along Beaver Street is now home to the Publix warehouse, Michael’s warehouse and the Winn-Dixie distribution center, which provide additional employment nearby.
Northwest Jacksonville

A less developed section of Jacksonville, it is primarily commercial/industrial around Interstate 295 and rural residential in most areas. Neighborhoods include: Allendale, Biltmore, Bulls Bay, Carver Manor, Cisco Gardens, College Gardens, Commonwealth, Edgewood, Edgewood Manor, Grand Park, Harborview, Lackawanna, Lake Forrest, Lake Forrest Hills, Lincoln Hills, Magnolia Gardens, Mixon Town, New Town, Osceola Forrest, Panama Park, Picketville, Ribault, Riverview, Robinsons Addition, Royal Terrace, Sherwood Forrest, Tallulah/North Shore, Woodstock, 45th & Chase.
Panama Park

Panama Park was home to two of Jacksonville’s previous mayors, and the founder’s of Duval Spirits, the late J. Baker Bryan and his brother Lon B. Bryan. Oceanway is the home of F. Andy Bryan, Grandson of the late J. Baker Bryan, his great grandson J. Baker Bryan IV, lives in the Orlando area.
North Shore

The North Jacksonville neighborhood of North Shore had Main Street as its eastern border from about 35th Street up to Trout River. Panama Park was the adjoining neighborhood to the east, Norwood to the west and Brentwood to the south. The western border was between Norwood Avenue and Pearl Street, with Elwood Avenue as the western border. North Shore from the 1930s through the 1990s was largely a lower middle income neighborhood that included churches, a school (North Shore Elementary), and some small businesses clustered near Pearl and 54th Streets and at Pearl Street and Tallalah Avenue. The churches included: North Jacksonville Baptist Church, North Shore Methodist Church, North Shore Christian Church and an Episcopal Chapel. Two parks provided playgrounds for its children, including Tallulah Park and another park at the foot of Pearl Street on Trout River. For many years, the latter offered a boat ramp and areas for outdoor cooking and Easter Egg hunts. After graduating from North Shore Elementary School, its young people went on to Kirby-Smith Junior High School (grades 8-9) and Andrew Jackson Senior High School (grades 10-12). The City of Jacksonville built Fire Station Number 15 on the corner of Pearl and 54th Streets in the late 1940s, and it was a frequent hangout for the young people who were hoping that a fire call would provide some excitement as the firemen dashed for their gear and headed out on the ancient old pumper with chain-driven wooden wheels. Boy Scout Troop 222, based at the North Shore Christian Church provided life-changing core values and produced over 50 Eagle Scouts during its many years of service to the community.
Urban core

The central section of Jacksonville has the following neighborhoods: Brentwood, Brooklyn, Downtown, East Jacksonville, Fairfield, Hogans Creek, LaVilla, Longbranch, Midtown, Mid-Westside, Moncrief, Phoenix, Springfield, Southside, Tallyrand and 29th & Chase.
LaVilla

LaVilla has a rich history that antedates its inclusion in the municipality of Jacksonville. For more information, see LaVilla.

Southside

In 1907, the town of South Jacksonville (now the Southside neighborhood) incorporated with a population of some 600. In 1913, 96 South Jacksonville voters approved the issuance of $65,000 in bonds for civic improvements, including a city hall. The building, at 1468 Hendricks Avenue, was completed in 1915 and is one of the few remaining signs that South Jacksonville existed, if only for 25 years. In 1932, the city of Jacksonville annexed the area, and it ceased to exist as a separate government entity.[7]
Springfield

Established in 1869, Springfield has a rich history that antedates its inclusion in the municipality of Jacksonville. For more information, see Springfield.

Nocatee

Nocotee

Nocatee, Florida (pronounced \ˈnäk-ˈā-ˈtē\) is an unincorporated master-planned community in St. Johns County and the extreme southeast corner of Duval County (the city of Jacksonville), Florida, United States.

Nocatee is an approved Development of Regional Impact (DRI) under Section 380.06 of the Florida Statutes[1]. The mixed used development is situated on approximately 13,323 acres (53.92 km2), which 11,332 acres (45.86 km2) are located in northeastern St. Johns County and approximately 1,991 acres (8.06 km2) are located in southeastern Jacksonville, Florida.

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PUMP

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PIPE

PARTS

CITY

QUICK DISCONNECT

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other websites we recommend you look at

www.asap-plumbing.com

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http://asappumpandliftstation.com
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http://asapdrywall.biz/
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SUMP PUMPS AND SEPTIC SYSTEMS
May 25th, 2010
SUMP PUMPS REPAIRS AND REPLACEMENT

Jacksonville Duval County 904-346-1266
St Augustine St Johns County 904-824-7144
Orange Park Clay County 904-264-6444
Jacksonville Beaches Duval County 904-246-3969
Fernandina Nassau County 904-277-3040
Macclenny Baker County 904-259-5091
Palm Coast Flagler County 386-439-5290
Daytona Volusia County 386-253-4911
Serving all of Florida and Georgia at 904-346-1266

EMAIL LARRY@1STPROP.COM (feel free to email your bidding packages here)

Plumbing

Drain Cleaning

High Pressure water jetting

Harben Water jetting

Sewer line replacement

Water line replacement

Fiber optic sewer video inpection service

We can insert a camera in your sewer line to see the problem before fixing it.

Backflow testing, installation, repair, and certification

Annual Backflow testing automated reminders. We will call you each year instead of you calling us.

Faucet replacement

Water Heater Replacement

Licensed Lift Station operator, we can repair, install and perform mandated monthly lift station inspections.

Utility services, and underground utility installations.

Septic tank operator, we can service your septic system, we can install your drain field or septic system and we can maintain it for you.

NOW HIRING

apply for a job online at www.asapapply.com

To get a FREE ESTIMATE CALL 904-993-3433

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http://www.asap-plumbing.com/Submit_a_New_Work_Order/submit_a_new_work_order.php

Serving the entire Jacksonville area including the following communities:

Argyle Forest
Arlington
Asbury Lake
Avondale
Baldwin
Bayard
Baymeadows
Beauclerc
Bryceville
Callahan
Cecil Field
Cedar Point
Cunningham
Dinsmore
Durkeeville
Five Points
Fruit Cove
Ft Caroline
Golfair
Greater Jacksonville
Herlong
Hidden Hills
Hilliard
Jacksonville
Jacksonville Beach
Jacksonville Heights
Jacksonville International Airport
Julington Creek
Lake Shore
Lakeside
Loretto
Macclenney
Mandarin
Marietta
Maxville
Middleburg
Murray Hill
New Berlin
Nocotee
Northside Jacksonville
Oak Leaf
Ocean Way
Ortega
Palencia
Palm Valley
Pecan Park
Pottsburg Creek
Queens Harbor
Riverside
San Jose
San Marco
Soutel
Southbank
Southpoint
Southside Jacksonville
Springfield
St Johns
St Nicholas
Starke
Switzerland
Talbot Island
Tallyrand
Timuquana
Westside Jacksonville
Whitehouse
World Golf Village
Yulee

- Alachua County- Jackson County- Seminole County- Calhoun County- Manatee County- Franklin County- Orange County- DeSoto County- Alachua County- Lake County- Duval County- Palm Beach County- Polk County- Miami-Dade County- Highlands County- Duval County- Miami-Dade County- Polk County- Jackson County- Miami-Dade County- Orange County- Gilchrist County- Pinellas County- Pinellas County- Pinellas County- Pinellas County- Palm Beach County- Orange County- Marion County- Flagler County- Miami-Dade County- Calhoun County- Palm Beach County- Holmes County- Lee County- Hardee County- Palm Beach County- Manatee County- Manatee County- Hillsborough County- Suwannee County- Palm Beach County- Liberty County- Levy County- Bradford County- Hernando CountyFlagler County- Sumter County- Nassau County- Bay County- Jackson County- Brevard County- Lee County- Franklin County- Washington County- Seminole County- Bay County- Levy County- Sumter County- Escambia County- Gadsden County- Levy County- Washington County- Okaloosa County- Pinellas County- Lake County- Hendry County- Palm Beach County- Brevard County-Brevard County- Broward County– Miami-Dade County- Sumter County- Broward County- Miami-Dade County- Broward County- Jackson County- Putnam County- Okaloosa County- Dixie County- Citrus County- Pasco County- Broward County- Polk County- Broward County- Volusia County- Volusia County- Volusia County- Broward County- Walton County– Volusia County- Palm Beach County- Volusia County- Okaloosa County- Polk County- Pinellas County- Marion County- Polk County- Orange CountyWashington County- Volusia County- Orange County- Holmes County- Lake County- Collier County- Gilchrist / Levy County- Indian River County- Nassau County- Flagler County- Miami-Dade County- Broward County- Polk County- Lee County- Lee County- St. Lucie County- Okaloosa County- Columbia County- Walton County- Polk County- Lake County- Alachua County- Palm Beach County- Baker County- Miami-Dade County- Palm Beach County- Jackson County- Jackson County- Palm Beach County- Clay County- Gadsden County- Madison County- Jackson County- Gadsden County- Lake County- Santa Rosa County- Pinellas County- Palm Beach County- Polk County- Broward County- Bradford County- St. Johns County- Gadsden County- Palm Beach County- Alachua County- Miami-Dade County- Miami-Dade County- Alachua County- Palm Beach County- Polk County- Polk County- Broward County- Volusia County- Broward County- Manatee County- Miami-Dade County- Dixie County- Lake County- Palm Beach County- Brevard County- Miami-Dade County- Brevard County- Indian River County- Pinellas County- Pinellas County- Levy County- Putnam County- Citrus County- Miami-Dade County- Jackson County- Duval County- Duval County- Hamilton County- Santa Rosa County- Hamilton County- Palm Beach County- Palm Beach County- Palm Beach County- Martin County- Pinellas County- Miami-Dade County- Monroe County- Monroe County- Clay County- Osceola County- Alachua CountyLake County- Polk County- Orange County- Union County- Columbia County- Palm Beach County- Polk County- Volusia County- Seminole County- Palm Beach County- Highlands County- Polk County- Palm Beach County- Polk County- Palm Beach County- Pinellas County- Broward County- Broward County- Broward County- Okaloosa County- Bradford County- Monroe County- Broward County- Madison County- Lake County- Broward County- Suwannee County- Sarasota County- Seminole County- Pasco County-Bay County- Baker County- Pinellas County- Madison County- Orange County- Brevard County- Jackson County- Palm Beach County- Palm Beach County- Monroe County- Collier County- Broward County- Jackson County- Okaloosa County- Lake County- Lafayette County- Marion County- Miami-Dade County- Brevard County- Brevard County- Brevard County- Bay County- Miami-Dade County- Miami-Dade County– Miami-Dade County-Miami-Dade County- Miami-Dade County- Alachua County- Gadsden County- Santa Rosa County- Lake County- Broward County- Jefferson County- Lake County- Glades County- Lake County- Polk County- Collier County- Duval County- Alachua County- Pasco County- Volusia County- Okaloosa County- Holmes County- Miami-Dade County- Broward County- Miami-Dade County- Miami-Dade County- Palm Beach County- Sarasota County- Pinellas County- Volusia County- Orange County- Broward County- Marion County- Martin County- Palm Beach County- Orange County- Okeechobee County- Pinellas County- Miami-Dade County- Volusia County- Clay County- Indian River County- Orange County- Volusia County- Levy County- Seminole County- Palm Beach County- Putnam County- Brevard County- Palm Beach County- Palm Beach County- Palm Beach County- Flagler CountyPinellas County- Brevard County- Palm Beach County- Manatee County- Bay County- Bay County- Bay County- Broward County- Walton County- Broward County- Broward County- Clay County- Escambia County- Taylor County- Volusia County- Miami-Dade County- Pinellas County- Broward County- Hillsborough County- Polk County- Putnam County- Putnam County- Holmes County- Volusia County- Volusia County- Pasco County- Gulf County- St. Lucie County- Charlotte County- Gadsden County- Union County- Marion County- Pinellas County- Pinellas County- Palm Beach County- Brevard County- Palm Beach County- Pinellas County- Pasco County- Seminole County- Lee County- Sarasota County- Brevard County- Broward County- Indian River County- Highlands County- Pinellas County- Martin County- Okaloosa County- Jackson County- Wakulla County- Palm Beach County- Volusia County- Miami-Dade County- Palm Beach County- Pinellas County- Broward County- Bay County- St. Johns County- St. Johns Beach- Osceola County- Pasco County- St. Lucie County- Wakulla County- Pinellas County- Pinellas County- Bradford County- Martin County- Miami-Dade County- Broward County- Miami-Dade County- Miami-Dade County- Leon County- Broward County- Hillsborough County- Pinellas County- Lake County- Hillsborough County- Palm Beach County- Brevard County- Pinellas County- Gilchrist County- Lake County- Okaloosa County- Sarasota County- Washington County- Indian River County- Miami-Dade County- Alachua County- Hardee County- Washington County- Sumter County- Hernando County- Putnam County- Palm Beach County- Brevard County- Miami-Dade County- Palm Beach County- Broward County- Holmes County- Gulf County- Hamilton County- Sumter County- Levy County- Broward County- Orange County- Orange County- Polk County- Orange County- Seminole County- Union County- Levy County- Pasco CountyZolfo Springs- Hardee County

Florida City County List

Alachua

Alford

Altamonte Springs

Altha

Anna Maria

Apalachicola

Apopka

Arcadia

Archer

Astatula

Atlantic Beach

Atlantis

Auburndale

Aventura

Avon Park

Baldwin

Bal Harbour

Bartow

Bascom

Bay Harbor Islands

Bay Lake

Bell

Belleair

Belleair Beach

Belleiar Bluffs

Belleair Shore

Belle Glade

Belle Isle

Belleview

Beverly Beach

Biscayne Park

Blounstown

Boca Raton

Bonifay

Bonita Springs

Bowling Green

Boynton Beach

Bradenton

Bradenton Beach

Brandon

Branford

Briny Breezes

Bristol

Bronson

Brooker

Brooksville

Bunnell -

Bushnell

Callahan

Callaway

Campbellton

Cape Canaveral

Cape Coral

Carrabelle

Caryville

Casselberry

Cedar Grove

Cedar Key

Center Hill

Century

Chattahoochee

Chiefland

Chipley

Cinco Bayou

Clearwater

Clemont

Clewiston

Cloud Lake

Cocoa

Cocoa Beach

Coconut Creek

Coconut Grove

Coleman

Cooper City

Coral Gables

Coral Springs

Cottondale

Crescent City

Crestview

Cross City

Crystal River

Dade City

Dania Beach

Davenport

Davie

Daytona Beach

Daytona Beach Shores

DeBary

Deerfield Beach

DeFuniak Springs

DeLand

Delray Beach

Deltona

Destin

Dundee

Dunedin

Dunnellon

Eagle Lake

Eatonville

Ebro -

Edgewater

Edgewood

El Portal

Eustis

Everglades City

Fanning Springs

Fellenfere

Fernandina Beach

Flagler Beach

Florida City

Fort Lauderdale

Fort Meade

Fort Myers

Fort Myers Beach

Fort Pierce

Fort Walton Beach

Fort White

Freeport

Frostproof

Fruitland Park

Gainesville

Glen Ridge

Glen St. Mary

Golden Beach

Golf

Graceville

Grand Ridge

Greenacres

Green Cove Springs

Greensboro

Greenville

Greenwood

Gretna

Groveland

Gulf Breeze

Gulfport

Gulf Stream

Haines City

Hallandale Beach

Hampton

Hastings

Havana

Haverhill

Hawthorne

Hialeah

Hialeah Gardens

High Springs

Highland Beach

Highland Park

Hillcrest Heights

Hillsboro Beach

Holly Hill

Hollywood

Holmes Beach

Homestead

Horseshoe Beach

Howey-in-the-Hills

Hypoluxo

Indialantic

Indian Creek

Indian Harbour Beach

Indian River Shores

Indian Rocks Beach

Indian Shores

Inglis

Interlachen

Inverness

Islandia

Jacob City

Jacksonville

Jacksonville Beach

Jasper

Jay

Jennings

Juno Beach

Jupiter

Jupiter Inlet Colony

Jupiter Island

Kenneth City

Key Biscayne

Key Colony Beach

Key West

Keystone Heights

Kissimmee

La Crosse

Lady Lake -

Lake Alfred

Lake Buena Vista

Lake Butler

Lake City

Lake Clarke Shores

Lake Hamilton

Lake Helen

Lake Mary

Lake Park

Lake Placid

Lake Wales

Lake Worth

Lakeland

Lantana

Largo

Lauderdale Lakes

Lauderdale by the Sea

Lauderhill

Laurel Hill

Lawtey

Layton

Lazy Lake

Lee

Leesburg

Lighthouse Point

Live Oak

Longboat Key

Longwood

Lutz

Lynn Haven

Macclenny

Madeira Beach

Madison

Maitland

Malabar

Malone

Manalapan

Mangonia Park

Marathon

Marco Island

Margate

Marianna

Mary Esther

Mascotte

Mayo

McIntosh

Medley

Melbourne

Melbourne Beach

Melbourne Village

Mexico Beach

Miami

Miami Beach

Miami Lakes

Miami Shores Village

Miami Springs

Micanopy

Midway

Milton

Minneola

Miramar

Monticello

Montiverde

Moore Haven

Mount Dora

Mulberry

Naples

Neptune Beach

Newberry

New Port Richey

New Smyrna Beach

Niceville

Noma

North Bay Village

North Lauderdale

North Miami

North Miami Beach

North Palm Beach

North Port

North Redington Beach

Oak Hill

Oakland

Oakland Park

Ocala

Ocean Breeze Park

Ocean Ridge

Ocoee

Okeechobee

Oldsmar

Opa-Locka

Orange City

Orange Park

Orchid

Orlando

Ormond Beach

Otter Creek

Oviedo

Pahokee

Palatka

Palm Bay

Palm Beach

Palm Beach Gardens

Palm Beach Shores

Palm Coast

Palm Harbor -

Palm Shores

Palm Springs

Palmetto

Panama City

Panama City Beach

Parker

Parkland

Paxton

Pembroke Park

Pembroke Pines

Penney Farms

Pensacola

Perry

Pierson

Pinecrest

Pinellas Park

Plantation

Plant City

Polk City

Pomona Park

Pompano Beach

Ponce De Leon

Ponce Inlet

Port Orange

Port Richey

Port St. Joe

Port St. Lucie

Punta Gorda

Quincy

Raiford

Reddick

Redington Beach

Redington Shores

Riviera Beach

Rockledge

Royal Palm Beach

Safety Harbor

San Antonio

Sanford

Sanibel

Sarasota

Satellite Beach

Sea Ranch Lakes

Sebastian

Sebring

Seminole

Sewall’s Point

Shalimar

Sneads

Sopchoppy

South Bay

South Daytona

South Miami

South Palm Beach

South Pasadena

Southwest Ranches

Springfield

St. Augustine

St. Augustine Beach

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other websites we recommend you look at

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www.dirtandsandforsale.com

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http://allprogas.com/

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http://allproplumbing.us/

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A sump pump is a pump used to remove water that has accumulated in a pit commonly found in the home basement to collect water called a sump pit. The water may enter via the perimeter drains of a basement waterproofing system, funneling into the pit or because of rain or natural ground water, if the basement is below the water table level.

Sump pumps are used where basement flooding happens regularly and to ameliorate dampness where the water table is above the foundation of a home. Sump pumps send water away from a house to any place where it is no longer problematic, such as a municipal storm drain or a dry well. Pumps may be connected to the sanitary sewer in older properties. Now, this practice may be against the plumbing code or at least municipal bylaws because it can overwhelm the municipal sewage treatment system.

Usually hardwired into a home’s electrical system, sump pumps may have a battery backup. The home’s pressurized water supply powers some pumps, eliminating the need for electricity. Since a sump pit may overflow if not constantly pumped, a backup system is important for cases when the main power is out for prolonged periods of time.

There are generally two types of sump pumps: pedestal and submersible. The pedestal pump’s motor is mounted above the pit, where it is more easily serviced but also more conspicuous. The submersible pump is entirely mounted inside the pit, and is specially sealed to prevent electrical short circuits.
Contents

[hide]

1 Components
2 Backup components
3 Maintenance
4 Resources
5 External

Components

Modern sump pump components in the United States are standardized. They consist of::

A plastic or metal canister forming a sump liner, approximately 2 feet (0.6 m) across and 2 to 3 feet (0.6 to 1 m) deep, 15 to 25 US gallons (60 to 100 L);
A sump pump, either 1/3 or 1/2 horsepower (200 or 400 W), either battery or electrically powered (or both);
A set of pipes, typically 1.5 inch (38 mm) PVC, that are routed from the pump, through a check valve, and out of the house;
A check valve allows water to flow up and out through the pipes, so when the pump turns off, the water in the pipes doesn’t flow backwards back into the sump;

Backup components

A secondary, typically battery-powered sump pump can operate if the first pump fails. A secondary pump requires the following components in parallel with the above others:

A battery-driven 12 V sump pump with its own water level sensor, piping, and check valve (the pipes usually join after the check valves to prevent reverse flow through the primary when the secondary unit is pumping);
A typical lead-acid battery. It may alternately be a marine deep cycle battery, or special long-life standby battery;
A trickle-charge battery charger. May alternately have a specialized controller to manage, monitor and test that the battery holding a charge.

Alternative sump pump systems can be driven by municipal water pressure. These pumps are similar to backup battery-driven systems with a separate pump, float and check valves.

If the backup sump systems is rarely used, a component failure may not be noticed and the system may fail when needed. Some battery control units test the system periodically and alert on failed electrical components.

A simple battery-powered water alarm can be hung a few inches below the top of the sump well to sound a shrill alarm should the water level rise too high.
Maintenance

Sump tanks and sump pumps must be maintained. Typical recommendations suggest examining equipment every year. Pumps running frequently due to higher water table, water drainage, or weather conditions should be examined more frequently. Sump pumps, being highly mechanical, will fail eventually, which could lead to a flooded basement requiring costly repairs.

When examining a sump pump and cleaning it, dirt, gravel, sand, and other debris should be removed to increase efficiency and extend the life of the pump. These obstructions can also decrease the pump’s ability to drain the sump, and can allow the sump to overflow. The check valve can also jam from the debris.

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ASAP Pump and Liftstation repairs and services
April 1st, 2010

Jacksonville Duval County 904-346-1266
St Augustine St Johns County 904-824-7144
Orange Park Clay County 904-264-6444
Jacksonville Beaches Duval County 904-246-3969
Fernandina Nassau County 904-277-3040
Macclenny Baker County 904-259-5091
Palm Coast Flagler County 386-439-5290
Daytona Volusia County 386-253-4911
Serving all of Florida and Georgia at 904-346-1266

We can service all size pumps including well pumps water pumps, irrigation pumps, marine pumps, sewage pumps.

We also install and service all sizes of LIFTSTATIONS.

We are a licensed and certified LIFTSTATION OPERATOR.

CALL US FOR A FREE ESTIMATE.

MONTHLY MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS AVAILABLE

SERVING ALL OF FLORIDA AND GEORGIA

MONTHLY SERVICE AVAILABLE

MONTHLY SERVICE CONTRACTS

LIFT STATION INSPECTIONS

LICENSED LIFT STATION COMPANY

INSURED

FREE ESTIMATES

STATE OF FLORIDA CERTIFIED PLUMBING CONTRACTOR

CFCO56659

LIFT STATION PUMPS

LIFT STATION CRANE

CONTROL PANELS

RAILS

we have a team of experienced individuals who come into your plant OR BUSINESS with a fresh pair of eyes. The system is checked from influent to effluent. System optimization, equipment efficiency and operational excellence are key components explored. Key Benefits Equipment efficiency Total Cost of Operation reductions Reliability and safety

An onsite audit is conducted to examine system parameters, process controls, and current monitor and control procedures. A physical walk-through is conducted, process flow diagrams are examined, previous design criteria are examined and current standard operating procedures are evaluated along with data logs.

Plumbing

Drain Cleaning

High Pressure water jetting

Harben Water jetting

Sewer line replacement

Water line replacement

Fiber optic sewer video inpection service

We can insert a camera in your sewer line to see the problem before fixing it.

Backflow testing, installation, repair, and certification

Annual Backflow testing automated reminders. We will call you each year instead of you calling us.

Faucet replacement

Water Heater Replacement

24 Hour Emergency Service – We can help with all types of plumbing issues

Repiping – Repair Plumbing – Bath Remodeling
Drain jetting and video inspection of sewer lines

Toilets, Sinks Faucets, Tubs, Garbage Disposal, Etc.
Slab Leaks, Shower Pans, and Drain Cleaning
TV / Video Sewer Line Inspections
Kitchen and Bath Remodeling
New Construction Plumbing
Senior Citizen and Military Discount
Sewer and Water Service Replacements
Water Softeners
Water Heaters installed

We accept MasterCard, Visa and American Express

Water Heaters
Repair or replacement of most models, including the latest tank-less water heaters.
Kitchen and Lavatory Faucets
Repair or replacement of faucets including special order faucets and designer faucets
Water Closets
Repair or replacement of water closets (toilets) including special order items
Sewer and Septic Service
We offer sewer conversion from septic to city sewer. This includes not only the installation of piping, but the repair of any broken sprinkler lines and sod replacement. We carry company-owned medium equipment for excavation and the latest technologies for septic to sewer conversion.
Complete Hot and Cold Water Repipes
We offer complete repipes including the replacement of hot water heaters, hose bibs, washer boxes and ice maker boxes. We have drywall and tile replacement staff on-site.
Bath Remodel Specialist
We staff bathroom remodel experts who can design and complete all bathroom remodel jobs, big or small. Our company has its own drywall and tile specialist.
Water Softeners
We offer repair, replacement and installations of water softeners and filters with the latest in digital and mechanical timers.

Licensed Lift Station operator, we can repair, install and perform mandated monthly lift station inspections.

Utility services, and underground utility installations.

Septic tank operator, we can service your septic system, we can install your drain field or septic system and we can maintain it for you.

LP Gas piping and repairs, natural gas piping and repairs, appliance repairs, boilers, water heaters, tankless water heaters, pool heaters, pool pumps, gas generators, medical gas piping, nitrogen gas piping, oxygen gas piping, med gas piping, manometer test, annual gas testing and inspections, splash guards, plumbing, free estimates, licensed and insured.

New construction, alterations, repairs, commercial, industrial, residential, medical, and hospitals…..all work is very welcome and appreciated.

We accept all major credit cards. Visa, Mastercard, Discover and American Express.

FOR MORTGAGE COMPANIES WE CAN INSPECT ALL PHASES OF WORKMANSHIP AND QUALITY CONTROL, FREE ESTIMATES, LICENSED AND INSURED.

Proper well construction and continued maintenance are keys to the safety of your water supply. Your state water-well contractor licensing agency, local health department, or local water system professional can provide information on well construction.

The well should be located so rainwater flows away from it. Rainwater can pick up harmful bacteria and chemicals on the land’s surface. If this water pools near your well, it can seep into it, potentially causing health problems.

To keep your well safe, you must be sure possible sources of contamination are not close by. Experts suggest the following distances as a minimum for protection — farther is better (see graphic on the right):

Septic Tanks, 50 feet
Livestock yards, Silos, Septic Leach Fields, 50 feet
Patroleum Tanks, Liquid-Tight Manure Storage and Fertilizer Storage and Handling, 100 feet
Manure Stacks, 250 feet

Many homeowners tend to forget the value of good maintenance until problems reach crisis levels. That can be expensive. It’s better to maintain your well, find problems early, and correct them to protect your well’s performance. Keep up-to-date records of well installation and repairs plus pumping and water tests. Such records can help spot changes and possible problems with your water system. If you have problems, ask a local expert to check your well construction and maintenance records. He or she can see if your system is okay or needs work.

Protect your own well area. Be careful about storage and disposal of household and lawn care chemicals and wastes. Good farmers and gardeners minimize the use of fertilizers and pesticides. Take steps to reduce erosion and prevent surface water runoff. Regularly check underground storage tanks that hold home heating oil, diesel, or gasoline. Make sure your well is protected from the wastes of livestock, pets, and wildlife.

Drilled Wells

Drilled wells penetrate about 100-400 feet into the bedrock. Where

you find bedrock at the surface, it is commonly called ledge. To

serve as a water supply, a drilled well must intersect bedrock

fractures containing ground water.

Drilled Well Construction Features

diameter that extends into the bedrock to prevent shallow

ground water from entering the well. By law, the casing has

to extend at least 18 feet into the ground, with at least five

feet extending into the bedrock. The casing should also extend a foot or two above the ground’s

surface. A sealant, such as cement grout or bentonite clay, should be poured along the outside of

the casing to the top of the well. The well is capped to prevent surface water from entering the

well.

The casing is usually metal or plastic pipe, six inches in

Wells with a shallow water table may feature a jet pump located inside the home. Pumps require

special wiring and electrical service. Well pumps should be installed and serviced by a qualified

professional registered with your state.

Submersible pumps, located near the bottom of the well, are most commonly used in drilled wells.

point where the discharge water line leaves the well to enter your home. The device attaches

directly to the casing below the frost line and provides a watertight subsurface connection,

protecting the well from frost and contamination.

Most modern drilled wells incorporate a pitless adapter designed to provide a sanitary seal at the

10- or 12- inches in diameter, and covered with a concrete well cap either at or below the

ground’s surface. This outmoded type of construction does not provide the same degree of

protection from surface contamination. Also, older wells may not have a pitless adapter to provide

a seal at the point of discharge from the well.

Older drilled wells may lack some of these sanitary features. The well pipe used was often eight-,

Hydrofracting A Drilled Well

Hydrofracting is a process that applies water or air under pressure into your well to open up existing

fractures near your well and can even create new ones. Often this can increase the yield of your well.

This process can be applied to new wells with insufficient yield and to improve the quantity of older wells.

Driven Well Construction Features

Assembled lengths of two inches to three inches diameter metal pipes are driven into the ground.

A screened “well point” located at the end of the pipe helps drive the pipe through the sand and

gravel. The screen allows water to enter the well and filters out sediment.

The pump for the well is in one of two places: on top of the well or in the house. An access pit is

usually dug around the well down to the frost line and a water discharge pipe to the house is

joined to the well pipe with a fitting.

The well and pit are capped with the same kind of large-diameter concrete tile used for a dug

Driven Wells

Like dug wells, driven wells pull water from the water-saturated

zone above the bedrock. Driven wells can be deeper than dug

wells. They are typically 30 to 50 feet deep and are usually

located in areas with thick sand and gravel deposits where the

ground water table is within 15 feet of the ground’s surface. In the

proper geologic setting, driven wells can be easy and relatively

inexpensive to install.

Although deeper than dug wells, driven wells are still relatively

shallow and have a moderate-to-high risk of contamination from

nearby land activities.

Dug Wells

Dug wells are holes in the ground dug by shovel or backhoe.

Historically, a dug well was excavated below the groundwater

table until incoming water exceeded the digger’s bailing rate. The

well was then lined (cased) with stones, brick, tile, or other

material to prevent collapse. It was covered with a cap of wood,

stone, or concrete. Since it is so difficult to dig beneath the ground

water table, dug wells are not very deep. Typically, they are only

10 to 30 feet deep. Being so shallow, dug wells have the highest

risk of becoming contaminated. To minimize the likelihood of

contamination, your dug well should have certain features. These

features help to prevent contaminants from traveling along the

outside of the casing or through the casing and into the well.

Dug Well Construction Features

The well should be cased with a watertight material (for example, tongue-and-groove precast

concrete) and a cement grout or bentonite clay sealant poured along the outside of the casing to

the top of the well.

The well should be covered by a concrete curb and cap that stands about a foot above the

ground.

The land surface around the well should be mounded so that surface water runs away from the

well and is not allowed to pond around the outside of the wellhead.

Ideally, the pump for your well should be inside your home or in a separate pump house, rather

older homes, dug before drilling equipment was readily available or when drilling was considered too

expensive. If you have a dug well on your property and are using it for drinking water, check to make sure

it is properly covered and sealed. Another problem relating to the shallowness of a dug well is that it may

go dry during a drought when the ground water table drops

Drain and Pipe Cleaning
This service includes not only the drain being cleaned by using mechanical means, but we also use the latest in camera equipment to view the drain line to locate and pin point specific problems in the drain line, thus eliminating unwanted excavation. We also utilize a fog machine capable of putting fog or smoke into the drain and vent systems to locate leaks. We carry the newest listening device for pin pointing leaks underground, inside and outside of your home or business.
tankless water heaters
toilets
shower pans
ceramic tile installers
floor drains
backflow preventer or preventor
shower head
jacuzzi tub
roman tub
roman shower valve
hand held shower valve
sinks
toilets
water closets
urinals
bidets
water fountains
faucets
tub
meter
shut off valves
washing machine box
washing machine connection
hose bibb
clean out
sewer line
hot and cold water repipes
insta hot
instant hot water
water heater
boilers
dishwasher connections
soap dispenser
pot filler
cast iron sink
water saving toilets
drinking fountain
body spa
spa
whirlpool tub
soap dish
toilet rack
flushometer
hand dryer
partitions

We service the following areas of northeast Florida:Jacksonville, Jacksonville Beach, Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fernandina, Amelia Island, Callahan, Yulee, Hillard, Macclenny, St George, St Marys, Kingsland, Orange Park, Middleburg, Green Cove Springs, Penny Farms, St Augustine, Hastings, Palatka, Keystone Heights, Starke, Lake City, Waldo, Baldwin, St Augustine Beach, Crescent Beach, Palm Coast, Daytona, Holly Hill, Titusville, Daytona Shores, Ormond Beach, Bunnell, Deland, Orange City, Port Orange, Orlando, New Smyrna Beach, Sanford, Palm Valley, Fruitcove, Mandarin, Lawtey, St. Augustine Beach, Switzerland, Vilano Beach, Marineland, Flagler Beach, Beverly Beach, Sanderson, and Glen St. Mary.

STATE CERTIFIED CONTRACTOR LICENSE NUMBER CFCO56659

STATE CERTIFIED GENERAL CONTRACTOR CGC1504600

NOW HIRING

apply for a job online at www.asapapply.com

CLICK BELOW AND PLACE A WORK ORDER

IN OUR AUTOMATED WORK ORDER SYSTEM

http://www.asap-plumbing.com/Submit_a_New_Work_Order/submit_a_new_work_order.php

We accept all major credit cards. Visa, Mastercard, Discover and American Express.

We service the following areas of northeast Florida: Jacksonville, Jacksonville Beach, Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fernandina, Amelia Island, Callahan, Yulee, Hillard, Macclenny, St George, St Marys, Kingsland, Orange Park, Middleburg, Green Cove Springs, Penny Farms, St Augustine, Hastings, Palatka, Keystone Heights, Starke, Lake City, Waldo, Baldwin, St Augustine Beach, Crescent Beach, Palm Coast, Daytona, Holly Hill, Titusville, Daytona Shores, Ormond Beach, Bunnell, Deland, Orange City, Port Orange, Orlando, New Smyrna Beach, Sanford, Palm Valley, Fruitcove, Mandarin, Lawtey, St. Augustine Beach, Switzerland, Vilano Beach, Marineland, Flagler Beach, Beverly Beach, Sanderson, and Glen St. Mary.

STATE CERTIFIED CONTRACTOR LICENSE NUMBER CFCO56659

STATE CERTIFIED GENERAL CONTRACTOR CGC1504600

NOW HIRING

apply for a job online at www.asapapply.com

CLICK BELOW AND PLACE A WORK ORDER

IN OUR AUTOMATED WORK ORDER SYSTEM

http://www.asap-plumbing.com/Submit_a_New_Work_Order/submit_a_new_work_order.php

Serving the entire Jacksonville area including the following communities:

Argyle Forest
Arlington
Asbury Lake
Avondale
Baldwin
Bayard
Baymeadows
Beauclerc
Bryceville
Callahan
Cecil Field
Cedar Point
Cunningham
Dinsmore
Durkeeville
Five Points
Fruit Cove
Ft Caroline
Golfair
Greater Jacksonville
Herlong
Hidden Hills
Hilliard
Jacksonville
Jacksonville Beach
Jacksonville Heights
Jacksonville International Airport
Julington Creek
Lake Shore
Lakeside
Loretto
Macclenney
Mandarin
Marietta
Maxville
Middleburg
Murray Hill
New Berlin
Nocotee
Northside Jacksonville
Oak Leaf
Ocean Way
Ortega
Palencia
Palm Valley
Pecan Park
Pottsburg Creek
Queens Harbor
Riverside
San Jose
San Marco
Soutel
Southbank
Southpoint
Southside Jacksonville
Springfield
St Johns
St Nicholas
Starke
Switzerland
Talbot Island
Tallyrand
Timuquana
Westside Jacksonville
Whitehouse
World Golf Village
Yulee

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As the largest city in land area in the contiguous United States, Jacksonville is divided both formally and informally into a few large sections. Though most residents divide the city into Northside, Southside, Westside, and—increasingly over the past decade, Arlington—Jacksonville’s official website divides the city into six major sections:[1]

Sections of Jacksonville

Greater Arlington, more commonly known to Jacksonville citizens simply as Arlington, is situated east and south of the St. Johns River and north of Beach Blvd.
North Jacksonville is officially designated by the city website as everything north of the St. Johns & Trout Rivers and east of US 1. Much of this area is known by Jacksonville residents as the Northside, though much of what is called “Northside” does not fall within these boundaries, and much of what falls within these boundaries has not been traditionally known as “Northside”.
Northwest Jacksonville is located north of Interstate 10, south of the Trout River and surrounds the downtown section. The parts of this area between US Highway 1 and the Trout and St. John’s River is usually considered part of either the “Northside” or, alternately, Downtown. Much of this section is actually rural land, not easily classified as part of any section.
Southeast Jacksonville, almost universally known as Southside, refers to everything east of the St. Johns River and south of Beach Blvd.
Southwest Jacksonville makes up most of what is known in Jacksonville as the Westside, though parts of Northwest Jacksonville also are considered part of the “Westside”. It consists of everything west of the St. Johns River and south of Interstate 10.
The Urban Core, most of which is commonly known as Downtown, includes the south & north banks of the narrowest part of the St. Johns River east from the Fuller Warren Bridge and extending roughly 4 miles (6.4 km) north and east.

With the rapid growth in the eastern part of Duval County, the Intracoastal/Beaches/Ponte Vedra area is viewed by many as a major section as well, but is not generally included in a Jacksonville list since they lie outside of the Jacksonville city limits. There is also a distinct part of the city known as “Eastside” which those unfamiliar with Jacksonville’s overall geography sometimes mistakenly regard as one of the major divisions of town, rather than the localized neighborhood which it is.

Today, what distinguishes a “section” of Jacksonville from a “neighborhood” is primarily a matter of size and divisibility. However, definitions are imprecise, and sometimes not universally agreed upon.[2]

Each of these sections not only encompasses a large area, but also, each is divided into many neighborhoods. Each of these neighborhoods, in turn, has its own identity.

Each of these sections is divided into many neighborhoods. Some of these neighborhoods, such as Mandarin and LaVilla, had existed previously as independent towns or villages, prior to consolidation, and have their own histories.
Contents

[hide]

1 Sections
1.1 North Jacksonville
1.1.1 Sandalwood
1.2 Southeast Jacksonville
1.2.1 Bayard
1.2.2 Baymeadows
1.2.3 Lakewood
1.2.4 Loretto
1.2.5 Mandarin
1.2.6 San Marco
1.2.7 Sunbeam
1.3 Southwest Jacksonville
1.3.1 Argyle
1.3.2 Avondale
1.3.3 Cedar Hills
1.3.4 Confederate Point
1.3.5 Lake Shore
1.3.6 Marietta
1.3.7 Normandy
1.3.8 Ortega
1.3.9 Paxon
1.3.10 Riverside
1.3.11 Whitehouse
1.4 Northwest Jacksonville
1.4.1 Panama Park
1.4.2 North Shore
1.5 Urban core
1.5.1 LaVilla
1.5.2 Southside
1.5.3 Springfield
2 References
3 External links

Sections
North Jacksonville
Sandalwood

The Sandalwood neighborhood began developing in the spring of 1960, midway between downtown Jacksonville and the beaches, or about 6 miles (9.7 km) from each, was advertised in 1960-61 as “On the Southside – halfway between business and pleasure!” The builder-developer, Pearce-Uible, was located at 3850 Beach Blvd.

The original neighborhood was bordered by the then two-lane Atlantic Boulevard on the north, a mile of palmetto and scrub on the south before reaching Beachwood neighborhood and Beach Boulevard, the western part of the neighborhood was bordered by the less than two-lane dirt road named St. John’s Bluff, and the eastern border of the neighborhood was defined by a storm drainage ditch called the Sandalwood Canal. The original streets are named after mostly South Pacific islands and most of the streets are, from north to south, in alphabetical order. The original street names are Aloha Drive; Batavia Drive; Caledonia Drive; Delago Drive; Eniwetok Drive; Fiji Court; Hawaii Drive East; Hawaii Drive South; Indies Drive North; Indies Drive East; Indies Drive South; Java Drive; Kuralei Drive; Mindanao Drive (The main drag); Sandalwood Boulevard (Original main entrance road); Bahia Drive; Dulawan Drive; and Kusaie Drive.

The were eight original home styles named as follows: Aloha; Bahama; Bikini; Caledonia; Del ray; Java; Polynesian; and Waikiki. Free airplane rides over Sandalwood were offered during the grand opening. The entrance and sales office located on Sandalwood Boulevard boasted a winding, palm lined street, and adjacent play area for the children. Homes were priced from $11,400 to $16,000, with monthly payments as low as $67. The original Sandalwood consisted of approximately 500 homes. The first families purchased homes in May and June 1960. Many of the first families were U.S. Navy families who were stationed at the Mayport base and others were employed by CSX railroad.

In the late 1970s, additional construction began at the southern border by the Sofranko Homes company, nearly doubling the size of the neighborhood. Most of the original early 1960s families have moved away over the years, but a handful of the original families are still left from the early 1960s.
Southeast Jacksonville

Neighborhoods include Arrowhead, Avenues, Bayard, Baymeadows, Baymeadows Center, Beach Haven, Beauclerc, Bowden, Brackridge, Brierwood, Craven, Deercreek, Deerwood, Deerwood Center, Del Rio, Englewood, Goodbys Creek, Greenfield Manor, Greenland, Isle of Palms, Julington Creek, Kilarney Shores, Lakewood, Loretto, Mandarin, Mandarin Station, Miramar, Montclair, Pickwick Park, Pine Forrest, Royal Lakes, San Jose, San Jose Forrest, San Marco, Sans Pareil, Sans Souci, Secret Cove, South Riverside, Southpoint, Southwood, Spring Park, Sunbeam, Tiger Hole and Windy Hill.
Bayard

Bayard has a rich history that antedates its inclusion in the municipality of Jacksonville. For more information, see Bayard.
Baymeadows

Baymeadows is a relatively affluent neighborhood centered around Baymeadows Road. It is situated south of Arlington (specifically, south of J. Turner Butler Boulevard) and east of Mandarin. A center for white-collar employment, it is home to many corporate office parks, upscale apartment complexes and residential developments, two private golf courses, several shopping centers and a large shopping mall. Deerwood and Hampton Glen and East Hampton and Reedy Branch Deercreek
Lakewood

Lakewood, which lies in the area where San Jose Blvd. and University Blvd intersect, is a residential area with houses built in the 1950s. It has several churches, two shopping centers, and a plethora of streets named after major private colleges, such as Clemson, Cornell, Fordham, and Emory.
Loretto

Loretto is a distinct part of the greater Mandarin area, and sits between San Jose Boulevard to the west and Philips Highway to the east. It is bordered to the north by Interstate 295 and to the south by the county line. Loretto was formed by the Catholic Diocese of St. Augustine. In the days of Reconstruction, Loretto sprouted up next to the nuns’ convent, dormitory and school. It is on what became Old St. Augustine Road, the highway between Jacksonville and St. Augustine. According to Wayne Wood’s Jacksonville’s Architectural Heritage, the nuns were sent there to educate both the residents and newly freed slaves. The Catholic Church still owns the property on all four corners of the intersection of St. Augustine Road and Loretto/Greenland Roads. The Loretto area public schools always have been highly regarded; on the FCAT, they’re all rated A, B or C. The average price for homes that become available in Loretto is just under $200K. Many homes are built on some of the largest new construction lots in the area and there are a lot of dead-end streets and cul-de-sacs. Over the length of San Jose Boulevard, residents can find just about every merchant, service or restaurant available in the city. Loretto has a solid, hometown feel, with established neighborhoods, parks and nature areas nearby, making it the proverbial middle America.
Mandarin

Mandarin has a rich history that antedates its inclusion in the municipality of Jacksonville. For more information, see Mandarin.

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Candidates for the 2010 steward elections are asked to submit their nominations by January 28. Nominate yourself.

Mandarin, Jacksonville, Florida

Mandarin is a neighborhood located in the southern most portion of Jacksonville, in Duval County, Florida, United States. It is located on the eastern banks of the St. Johns River, across from Orange Park. Mandarin was named after the Mandarin orange in 1830 by Calvin Reed, a prominent resident of the area .

Once called “a tropical paradise” by author Harriett Beecher Stowe, the quaint area of Mandarin is marked by its history, ancient oak trees draped with Spanish moss, beautiful parks, marinas and more water views than any other area in Jacksonville. In the 1800s, Mandarin was a small farming village that shipped oranges, grapefruit, lemons and other fruits and vegetables to Jacksonville and points north on the steamships that traveled the St. Johns River. In 1864, the Union steamship, the Maple Leaf, hit a Confederate mine and sank just off Mandarin Point.

While Mandarin now is just a small section of the City of Jacksonville, its natural beauty, parks and historic buildings draw visitors from around the world. Just a short drive south of Jacksonville’s city center, the community is bordered by Beauclerc to the north, Julington Creek to the south and St. John’s River to the west.
Contents

[hide]

1 History
1.1 Harriet Beecher Stowe
1.2 Famous Residents
1.3 20th Century
2 Geography
3 References
4 External links

History
Harriet Beecher Stowe
Main article: Palmetto Leaves

In 1867 the famous author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe bought a cottage here. For the next seventeen winters, she welcomed tourists debarking from the steamers making their way down the St. Johns River and charged them 75 cents each to meet her and admire her surroundings.

Stowe, although best known for her novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin about the cruelty of slavery, also wrote about Florida.

She had promised her Boston publisher another novel, but was so taken with northeast Florida that she produced instead a series of sketches of the land and the people which she submitted in 1872 under the title Palmetto Leaves. Her second book did not outsell her first novel, but did have the effect of drawing rich and fashionable tourists to visit her.

In Palmetto Leaves Stowe describes life in Florida in the latter half of the 19th century; “a tumble-down, wild, panicky kind of life—this general happy-go-luckiness which Florida inculcates.” Her idyllic sketches of picnicking, sailing, and river touring expeditions and simple stories of events and people in this tropical “winter summer” land became the first unsolicited promotional writing to interest northern tourists in Florida.[1]

A small chapel is dedicated to Harriet Beecher Stowe in Mandarin.
Famous Residents

The late Allen Collins from the rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd resided some of his last years in Mandarin before he passed. Mandarin was also the location where Allen was involved in a car accident during 1986 that left him paralyzed from the waist down and his girlfriend dead.
20th Century

In 1968, the city of Jacksonville and most of Duval County formed a consolidated municipal unit. As part of this process, Mandarin ceased to exist as a political entity, and became part of the City of Jacksonville.

In 1990, with the rapid growth of Mandarin, a new public high school was opened in the area. Several prominent citizens in Jacksonville urged that the new school be named Harriet Beecher Stowe High School, but the proposal did not receive widespread acceptance, and instead the school was simply named, Mandarin High School.
Geography

Mandarin is located at 30°09′37″N 81°39′34″WCoordinates: 30°09′37″N 81°39′34″W (30.1603, -81.6594).[2] / 30.1603°N 81.6594°W / 30.1603; -81.6594 / 30.1603°N 81.6594°W / 30.1603; -81.6594
References

^ “Palmetto Leaves”. University Press of Florida. http://www.upf.com/Spring1999/stowe.html. Retrieved 2006-09-06.
^ “US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990″. United States Census Bureau. 2005-05-03. http://www.census.gov/geo/www/gazetteer/gazette.html. Retrieved 2008-01-31.

External links

Map of Mandarin, 1917
Palmetto Leaves
Mandarin Museum & Historical Society

San Marco

San Marco is a relatively small and generally upscale neighborhood located south of Downtown and north of Mandarin. Due to large differences in property value, income distribution, and reported crime statistics in a relatively small area, San Marco is diverse. In one block, residences range from low cost, multi-family dwellings to sprawling riverside mansions. It is an area of historical and cultural significance in Jacksonville, and its inhabitants and proprietors identify strongly with their community.

Known as a trendy area, the most identifying feature of San Marco is “the Square,” an artsy shopping, dining, and entertainment district; its galleries, restaurants, and boutiques are overwhelmingly independently owned, operated, and supported which lends to its vogue. Visitors of the Square are likely to see polite intermingling between young professionals, landed gentry, “scenesters,” and “starving artists.”

Common landmarks are its large statue of three lions and the Art Deco styled San Marco Theater.
Sunbeam

Sunbeam is a relatively new neighborhood centered around Sunbeam Road which runs east/west between Philips Highway and San Jose Boulevard. It is situated south of Baymeadows Road, east of Mandarin and north of the Avenues Mall. The area includes the site of the former Sunbeam Sanitary Landfill which opened in 1972. The dump emitted objectionable odors, which discouraged development nearby. The landfill permit expired in 1986, and the facility stopped accepting garbage. After being covered with a 3-foot (0.91 m) deep cap, which prevents the elements from coming in and waste from coming out, the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation (FDER) certified it closed on October 21, 1992. [3] With the odor problem resolved, development resumed in the middle 1990’s including subdivisions, apartment complexes, commercial buildings and the Community Hospice of Northeast Florida center. A golf course on and around the original landfill was planned and delayed for several years but construction finally began in late 2007 and projected to open in Fall, 2008. However, the financial meltdown delayed opening. At the end of 2009, the course was substantially complete but work on a clubhouse had not commenced.
Southwest Jacksonville

.[4]..[5]. Neighborhoods include Argyle, Avondale, Cedar Hills, Cedar Hills Estates, Chimney Lakes, Confederate Point, Duclay, Duclay Forest, Fairfax, Herlong, Hillcrest, Hyde Park, Jax Farms, Jacksonville Heights, Lakeshore, Maxville, McGirts Creek, Murray Hill, Normandy Manor, Normandy Village, Oak Hill, Ortega, Ortega Farms, Ortega Forest, Ortega Hills, Otis, Riverside, Rolling Hills, Settlers Landing, Sweetwater, Venetia, Wesconnett, Whitehouse, Yukon and West Jacksonville.

The Westside is home to Paxon School for Advanced Studies, which happens to be one of the top schools in the nation by academics since 2003. The Westside is also home to some of the most culturally diverse schools in Duval County to date.
Argyle

One of the newest and largest neighborhoods on Jacksonville’s Westside, and occupying a large area of former ranchland, Argyle has grown rapidly from its beginnings in the mid-1980s. Straddling the Duval/Clay county line, Argyle was originally accessible only from Blanding Boulevard in Orange Park. However, as it has expanded westward, Argyle is now connected to Jacksonville’s far-Westside by a number of roads, including the Brannan Field-Chaffee Road corridor that links I-10 directly with Middleburg. Argyle remains a popular choice for middle-class families that are recently settling in Jacksonville.
Avondale

Historic Avondale lies along the St. John’s River southwest of the Riverside area, some three to four miles (6 km) upriver from downtown Jacksonville. Avondale is known for its quiet, tree-lined residential streets and hundreds of quaint homes, most dating from the early 1920s during the Great Florida Land Boom. A few Avondale homes pre-date 1900. Most homes in the neighborhood reflect the middle to upper income taste in residential architecture of the 1920s, including numerous Prairie School, Art Deco, Craftsman Style, Classical Revival, and Mediterranean Revival styles. Avondale is characterized by numerous bungalows and spacious, graceful homes. Unlike some other neighborhoods, Avondale never experienced a period of decline during the latter 20th Century, and retains much of its original gentility.

Two-lane St. John’s Avenue is the key traffic artery through Avondale, and is the location of the Avondale Shops, a small but vibrant collection of specialty shops, clothing stores, cafes, and upscale restaurants, most of which are located in original 1920s structures.

The Avondale Historic District is a U.S. historic district in Jacksonville, Florida. It is bounded by Roosevelt Boulevard, Belvedere Avenue, Seminole Road, the St. Johns River, and Talbot Avenue, encompasses approximately 2730 acres, and contains 729 historic buildings. On July 6, 1989, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.
Cedar Hills

Cedar Hills lies along the Cedar River (called Cedar Creek by the locals), on the opposite shore from Lake Shore, and stretches from Blanding Boulevard on the east to Lane Avenue to the west. Built in the 1940s, Cedar Hills consists of some 3,000 single-family brick or concrete block homes in seven different residential neighborhoods that are anchored by the Cedar Hills Shopping Center business district. Most of the homes are modest, although many of the homes along the shore of the Cedar River have been greatly expanded, or replaced with much larger homes.
Confederate Point

Built in the 1960s on reclaimed lowlands, technically a small island surrounded by a moat, with one small bridge as access. Confederate Point lies along the Cedar River (called Cedar Creek by the locals), on the opposite shore from Lake Shore. Confederate Point stretches from the Ortega River to the east, to Blanding Boulevard on the West, and is bordered by the Cedar River to the North, and Timaquana Boulevard to the South. The area consists of approximately 300 large, single family homes, and approximately 700 condos and apartments that line the south bank of the Cedar River. All of the single family homes are inland, with the apartments and condos lining the shore of the Cedar River. The area is popular given that it is close to water, and Downtown, yet also exclusive in that there is only one road in or out.
Lake Shore

Built during the time of the first World War, Lake Shore lies on the curving north bank of the Cedar River (called Cedar Creek by the locals), and stretches from Roosevelt Boulevard on the east, to the Cedar River to the West, and is bordered by the Cedar River to the South, and Park Street to the North, and is bisected by Cassat Avenue. Lake Shore consists of approximately 1,000 modest, wood-frame, concrete block or brick homes, with the exception of approximately 80 quite large estates that line the shore of the Cedar River. The neighborhood is anchored by the Roosevelt Plaza on Roosevelt Boulevard, and the Lake Shore business district of stores up and down Cassat Avenue. Lake Shore is centrally located on the Westside, with quick access to Downtown Jacksonville via Roosevelt Boulevard. Given the small size of the existing homes, the current trend is for first time home buyers to renovate and retrofit these well built homes to fit today’s needs. This is a very well maintained pocket of 1940s and 1950s homes. There is a definite trend to renovate and revitalize this quiet, comfortable neighborhood.
Marietta

Marietta is one of the small farming communities that was absorbed during the 1968 consolidation of Jacksonville with Duval County. Though technically a part of the city proper today, much of Marietta still retains its small-town, and even rural “feel”, with some old-style farms and ranches, and most homes occupying lots of 10 acres (40,000 m2) or more, on which they keep horses and cattle, or raise grain and maintain orchards. Marietta is popular with old Southern families, and new families who moved to Jacksonville from mid-western agricultural states. Companies looking for more space have also found Marietta. The area west of Marietta and east of Whitehouse along Beaver Street is now home to the Publix warehouse, Michael’s warehouse and the Winn-Dixie distribution center.
Normandy

Outside of what would eventually become Jacksonville, and originally called “Hogan Settlement”, The Normandy area was settled by Jacksonville’s “Founding Family”, the “Hogan’s” who were the first white settlers in Duval County. The Normandy area is a large swath of forested high-ground that straddles both sides of Normandy Boulevard, and stretches from Cassat Avenue on the East, out to Herlong Airfield on the West, and is bordered by I-10 to the North, and Wilson Road to the South. Though originally populated by the large ranches of many of Duval County’s founding families such as the Hogans, Lindseys, Fourakers, and the Herlongs, the area is now a bedroom community, containing over a dozen large residential neighborhoods such as Normandy, Normandy Village, Rolling Hills, Country Creek, Crystal Springs, Hyde Grove, Hyde Park, etc, with very few apartment complexes or condo developments. These neighborhoods have their own sewer and water plants, and unlike most wood-constructed homes in Jacksonville’s newer neighborhoods, most homes in the Normandy area are constructed of brick, or concrete block. The area is home to some of the city’s best schools, and parks. Unlike other sections of the city, where people tend to move from home to home every 2 or 3 years; homes in the Normandy area are routinely transferred from generation to generation, and it is not unusual for great-grandchildren to live in homes originally built by their great-grandparents.[6].
Ortega

Historic Ortega lies on the St Johns River just south of the historic Riverside area. Ortega is bordered by the St. Johns River on the East, the Cedar River on the North, and the Ortega river on the West, practically making it an “inland island.” The history of the area includes a number of interesting characters: botanist William Bartram; highwayman and cattle rustler Daniel McGirtt; and Don Juan McQueen, who attempted to establish a plantation on his 1791 Ortega land grant, but was forced to leave due to attacks of Georgians and the French. Gangster George “Machine Gun” Kelly and his wife were rumored to be the mysterious couple who abruptly left their rented Grand Avenue home hours before a midnight police raid in 1933. Ortega is home to hundreds of mid-size to large, turn-of-the-century homes and Southern Style mansions. Many of these homes are situated directly on the river, and the nature of the “island” allows ease of access to the waterways for all residents. Along with Avondale and Riverside, Ortega is home to some of the wealthiest of Jacksonville families. It is marked by a distinctly traditional Southern culture complete with one of the South’s most exclusive debutante coiteries. The island is almost exclusively residential, the only exception being a small square in the section known as “Old Ortega” on the northern end where a small collection of restaurants, boutiques, and a pharmacy are found. Ortega, with its giant oaks, waterfront mansions, and series of parks is widely considered one of the most beautiful residential areas of Northeast Florida.
Paxon

Platted in the 1920s and 30’s, the Paxon area is one of the oldest, pre-platted neighborhoods in Jacksonville. Built due to the redistribution of housing after the Great Fire, the Paxon area replaced the many thousands of homes that were destroyed in the Great Fire with thousands of modest, wood-framed homes. The Paxon area was extensively well-planned with its own schools (originally known as Paxon Sr. High School and Paxon Jr. High School, along with a half-dozen small elementary schools). The area straddles Edgewood Avenue South, and stretches from Mcduff Avenue to the East, and I-295 to the West, and is bordered by I-10 to the South, and I-295 to the North. The area originally contained over 40,000 single family homes in over 15 different residential neighborhoods, all anchored by the Edgewood Avenue, and Beaver Street business districts. However, over time, the area declined due to the small average size of the homes, and many of those homes were destroyed, and replaced with warehouses and mixed industry. Despite the new industrialization of the area overall, there are still many thousands of occupied homes in the Paxon area. Paxon Senior High School has been converted into a magnet school—it is now known as Paxon School for Advanced Studies—which has been listed by Forbes Magazine as one of the top three high schools in the United States for the last four years.[citation needed]
Riverside
Whitehouse

The community of Whitehouse was originally founded due to its close proximity to NAS Cecil Field, with most residents being active Navy personnel or civilian employees at the facility. When the federal government closed Cecil Field in 1999, the leaving military workers were replaced by civilian workers at the Cecil Commerce Center. The area east of Whitehouse along Beaver Street is now home to the Publix warehouse, Michael’s warehouse and the Winn-Dixie distribution center, which provide additional employment nearby.
Northwest Jacksonville

A less developed section of Jacksonville, it is primarily commercial/industrial around Interstate 295 and rural residential in most areas. Neighborhoods include: Allendale, Biltmore, Bulls Bay, Carver Manor, Cisco Gardens, College Gardens, Commonwealth, Edgewood, Edgewood Manor, Grand Park, Harborview, Lackawanna, Lake Forrest, Lake Forrest Hills, Lincoln Hills, Magnolia Gardens, Mixon Town, New Town, Osceola Forrest, Panama Park, Picketville, Ribault, Riverview, Robinsons Addition, Royal Terrace, Sherwood Forrest, Tallulah/North Shore, Woodstock, 45th & Chase.
Panama Park

Panama Park was home to two of Jacksonville’s previous mayors, and the founder’s of Duval Spirits, the late J. Baker Bryan and his brother Lon B. Bryan. Oceanway is the home of F. Andy Bryan, Grandson of the late J. Baker Bryan, his great grandson J. Baker Bryan IV, lives in the Orlando area.
North Shore

The North Jacksonville neighborhood of North Shore had Main Street as its eastern border from about 35th Street up to Trout River. Panama Park was the adjoining neighborhood to the east, Norwood to the west and Brentwood to the south. The western border was between Norwood Avenue and Pearl Street, with Elwood Avenue as the western border. North Shore from the 1930s through the 1990s was largely a lower middle income neighborhood that included churches, a school (North Shore Elementary), and some small businesses clustered near Pearl and 54th Streets and at Pearl Street and Tallalah Avenue. The churches included: North Jacksonville Baptist Church, North Shore Methodist Church, North Shore Christian Church and an Episcopal Chapel. Two parks provided playgrounds for its children, including Tallulah Park and another park at the foot of Pearl Street on Trout River. For many years, the latter offered a boat ramp and areas for outdoor cooking and Easter Egg hunts. After graduating from North Shore Elementary School, its young people went on to Kirby-Smith Junior High School (grades 8-9) and Andrew Jackson Senior High School (grades 10-12). The City of Jacksonville built Fire Station Number 15 on the corner of Pearl and 54th Streets in the late 1940s, and it was a frequent hangout for the young people who were hoping that a fire call would provide some excitement as the firemen dashed for their gear and headed out on the ancient old pumper with chain-driven wooden wheels. Boy Scout Troop 222, based at the North Shore Christian Church provided life-changing core values and produced over 50 Eagle Scouts during its many years of service to the community.
Urban core

The central section of Jacksonville has the following neighborhoods: Brentwood, Brooklyn, Downtown, East Jacksonville, Fairfield, Hogans Creek, LaVilla, Longbranch, Midtown, Mid-Westside, Moncrief, Phoenix, Springfield, Southside, Tallyrand and 29th & Chase.
LaVilla

LaVilla has a rich history that antedates its inclusion in the municipality of Jacksonville. For more information, see LaVilla.

Southside

In 1907, the town of South Jacksonville (now the Southside neighborhood) incorporated with a population of some 600. In 1913, 96 South Jacksonville voters approved the issuance of $65,000 in bonds for civic improvements, including a city hall. The building, at 1468 Hendricks Avenue, was completed in 1915 and is one of the few remaining signs that South Jacksonville existed, if only for 25 years. In 1932, the city of Jacksonville annexed the area, and it ceased to exist as a separate government entity.[7]
Springfield

Established in 1869, Springfield has a rich history that antedates its inclusion in the municipality of Jacksonville. For more information, see Springfield.

Nocatee

Nocotee

Nocatee, Florida (pronounced \ˈnäk-ˈā-ˈtē\) is an unincorporated master-planned community in St. Johns County and the extreme southeast corner of Duval County (the city of Jacksonville), Florida, United States.

Nocatee is an approved Development of Regional Impact (DRI) under Section 380.06 of the Florida Statutes[1]. The mixed used development is situated on approximately 13,323 acres (53.92 km2), which 11,332 acres (45.86 km2) are located in northeastern St. Johns County and approximately 1,991 acres (8.06 km2) are located in southeastern Jacksonville, Florida.

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